Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Kapi Falhaar#2 ~ Chattambade | Masala Vade (Mangalorean Style Spicy Bengal Gram Fritters)


Most of the tea time snacks in Mangalore are deep fried ones, available twice a day - in the mornings, mostly as a mid morning snack and in the evening at tea time. Most of these are deep fried ones and I've had many fond memories of enjoying some freshly made, piping hot snacks at small hotels outside my college or around town. In those days when people shopped around on the busy streets of Hampankatta, Mangalore's popular shopping area, it was customary for them to take a break and have a cuppa accompanied by some traditional snacks. Today's snack is one of those wonderful snacks that I had as a child along with others - I won't name all of them as I hope to try each and everyone of them in this series. 

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Bhapa Doi ~ Steamed (or Baked) Yogurt Dessert


Despite having a stock pile of recipes that I wanted to try for Easter I was simply unable to try them out in time. Some recipes needed tweaking and some needed better pictures to be clicked. In the midst of it all I randomly tried my hand at making a dessert to use up some leftover condensed milk from my homemade Nutella making session - after making two batches of it I had plenty of half used tins which had to be put to better use and I came across this recipe idea while browsing on the net. I referred to a few before zeroing on the measures which are my own as I had to make use of every drop of condensed milk. Thankfully my experiment didn't fail although the dessert was a tad too sweet for my liking but I guess with some extra milk added to it, it should serve the purpose next time. 

This dessert is a marvel. No wonder the Bongs are crazy over it. It is one lovely dessert to make with minimum effort and with simple ingredients! Originally a steamed dessert, you can easily make it in the oven if you have one and chill it overnight if you have a party the next day. Seriously, I love make ahead desserts, its just one less thing to do the next day. Plus, who doesn't like chilled desserts? While the term 'dessert' brings to mind the fancy western delights like mousses or cheesecakes or puddings or flans this one is as desi as it can be. If you skip the flavouring, all you need is milk, condensed milk and the most important and humble ingredient - yogurt (curds as we call it in India).

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Chicken Masala Fry ~ Appetizer or Side Dish!



The upcoming week is going to be a very busy one for me. Not just because the Holy Week has officially begun today but also because I am expecting guests who will be with us to celebrate Easter this year. I am really looking forward to having family over. Although I had planned many posts for Easter I am hardly able to steal sometime to do full justice to them so I guess I will roll them out one by one after the extended festivities end. Hopefully this week I will post another couple of recipes before Maundy Thursday after which I will be super busy at home and at the church. 

Today I suddenly decided to take the plunge and post a recipe before I go into hiberantion. I don't have much to type as my mind is currently on the pile of unfinished chores waiting for me, so let me jump straight to the recipe. Since I love bookmarking chicken recipes this one has been on my to-do list for a while. However, I wasn't really convinced whether the final result would be good enough to blog about but I was taken by surprise. Not only was this recipe different in its method it was damn delicious! The caramelised onions really added a unique flavour to the final dish. I only wish I had used spicier chillies but I guess if you stick to my recipe and the way I made it it is most suitable for people of all ages, especially little ones who can't take a lot of spice

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Paneer Kurma | Paneer Korma (Cottage Cheese in a Spicy Yogurt Gravy)


I know this sounds silly but I feel so triumphant today! I have finally made something out of paneer and it turned out great! You see, I never really tried making paneer at home as the husband wasn't too fond of it. The problem was that he had eaten the chewy sort, from his experience of eating out at places that perhaps used aged paneer which tastes absolutely rubbish (once you've begun to eat fresh paneer that is). Over the past few years I have tried convincing him to eat it but he wasn't too keen. I then decided to start preparing it at home as I felt that it was about time my kids got used to it. Paneer is a great meal option especially if you are a vegetarian and your intake of protein is limited to just lentils/dals/legumes. In my case, my son doesn't enjoy chicken anymore, fish and eggs are a no no with him and red meat is something we don't bring so often. What else can give him the nourishment he needs? Paneer and soya ofcourse. While I had prepared a few dishes with soya before, it was my first tryst with paneer. I didn't really have the time to make the paneer from scratch and plus I have had satisfactory results with the fresh paneer that we get here at the Lulu supermarket

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Mangalorean Plated Meal Series - Boshi# 18 - Mushroom Curry, Gule Sukhe, Salad & Neer Dosa


BOSHI# 18

Until now I thought presenting a pure veg boshi was a pain. Not anymore! I actually had fun putting this meal plan together as I felt the selection of items and flavours complemented each other very well. The mushrooms could very well be a meat replacement (in terms of their texture) - the health benefits of these are immense - they are a good source of lean protein and fibre, the black eyed peas is a good source of protein while the potatoes add to the carbs. To supplement this I have added freshly cut cucumbers to balance the intake of nutrients. All this is served with simple neer dosa/panpolay to make it one delicious yet simple lunch! 

I hope you give this boshi a try and let me know how you liked it! If you have tried any of my recipes please drop me an email at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com. I'd love to hear from you!

Do check the complete Boshi series here

RECIPES:

Monday, March 23, 2015

Mushroom Curry


I am back to another week of blogging after a pretty hectic yet fulfilling weekend. This week I will be posting the last few vegetarian recipes I have and I hope you've enjoyed the collection. When I am on the hunt for veg recipes there is never a dearth of people who share their favourite recipes with me. I happened to chat with my old friend from Mangalore who was part of the same choir at the church I went to. She now lives in Mysore and over the chat she told me how she loves veg food and having been transformed into vegetarian now has a big collection of recipes. Obviously I asked her to share a few with me and within a few minutes she emailed me her hit recipes - I am so grateful to her for having shared a variety of recipes from salads to pickles and everything in between! Thank you so much Joylyn for your generosity!

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Kapi Falhaar#1 ~ Godachi Kapi ~ Traditional Mangalorean Brewed Coffee Sweetened with Palm Jaggery


One of Mangalore's most traditional beverages is a freshly brewed coffee sweetened with palm jaggery (obtained from the Palmyra palm, commonly known as the 'Eerol/Irvol fruit tree). While some people prefer having it plain without milk (called as 'puti kapi') some add some creamy whole milk to it that helps create a beautiful blend of milky goodness. I was introduced to this version of the coffee (with palm jaggery) after I delivered my second baby a couple of years ago. Till then, I had only heard about the godachi kapi. The term 'god' stands for jaggery in Konkani. In Mangalore we popularly use two types of jaggery, the most common one is made from unrefined sugarcane juice (called as just 'god' or 'kobache god' where 'kobu' stands for sugarcane) and the other called as 'pele (pelem) /pelyache god or 'surai god' which is obtained from the palmyra tree. The stack of jaggery discs is called as the 'pelo' and 'surai' means one that is obtained from 'sur' or toddy. The third and less popular variety is the coconut palm jaggery called as 'narli god' which is obtained from the toddy of the coconut tree. They say that it is pretty hard to tell the difference between the last two as both are sold in stacks of 12-14 discs and look similar in colour and aroma. If I manage to unravel the mystery on my next trip to Mangalore I will definitely share the information with you.

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Corn Rice


Ever since we moved to Dubai we've increased our intake of corn, not because of any particular reason but just because of its availability and the fact that the kids love it. While I usually buy corn cobs regularly from the Farmers Market when it is in season I also like to stock up on frozen corn kernels as it turns out to be a perfectly handy option. My little one enjoys some kernels with some butter in it and the older fellow has always been a huge fan of steamed corn on the cob with some butter, chilli powder and lime juice slathered all over it. The two of them simply relish this healthy snack. 

Another great way of adding corn to our menu is in the form of this simple yet tasty, no fuss one pot meal. I usually make it when I am in a hurry to finish cooking and leave home on an errand. 

Sunday, March 15, 2015

Muska Baji ~ Drumstick Leaves Sukhe



Another traditional dish from Mangalore is a simple saute/sukka way of preparing drumstick leaves. Today, as I know it, not many people cook the leaves as they are not as popular as the drumsticks themselves which are widely used in South Indian cuisine, especially in the preparation of sambhar. My grandma had a drumstick tree in her backyard but I have no recollection of ever eating the cooked leaves. One of Roshan's relatives told me about the health benefits of the leaves and I've been a convert since then. 

The leaves apparently have been elevated to the status of a 'superfood' by the U.N and the Moringa trees have been used to combat malnutrition, especially among infants and nursing mothers. Moringa oleifera as it is known botanically has plenty of uses and goes by several common names such as moringa, drumstick tree, horseradish tree (the roots taste like horseradish), ben oil tree or benzoil tree. I was surprised to know that India is the largest producer of Moringa as it is native to the southern foothills of the Himalayas in northwestern India and is widely cultivated in tropical ares. Apart from its herbal uses it is also used for water purification and hand washing! Wow! Indeed a superfood.

Saturday, March 14, 2015

Pineapple Saasive | Ananas Sasam (No Cook Method) ~ Mangalorean Brahmin Style

During my growing up years in Mangalore almost every household that grew its own veggies on a small patch of land, usually a backyard garden, used to grow pineapples among other basic vegetables and fruits. It was nice to enjoy seasonal harvest throughout the year because apart from the fact that it was free, it was also organic. Although we didn't grown pineapples in our yard we did enjoy some fruit that was grown in our neighbour's yard which they occasionally shared with us. Honestly, I didn't care much for free goodies then, I never valued them until I left Mangalore and have had to purchase everything. 

Having grown up in a neighbourhood that had a good mix of cultures I have had the good fortune of tasting food from every community in Mangalore. We had Havyaka Brahmins who lived in the next compound, where I spent many a joyous hours of my childhood playing with the kids there. Amma as we called their mother reared cows so that the milk could be sold - a way to make two ends meet. Whenever I visited their house (which was daily, after school) I kept myself busy in the verandah or within the compound, playing endless games of digging the ground, making mud cakes and castles, chasing butterflies and playing with their crazy, ferocious mongrel, Tiger. 

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Kapi Falhaar#2 ~ Chattambade | Masala Vade (Mangalorean Style Spicy Bengal Gram Fritters)


Most of the tea time snacks in Mangalore are deep fried ones, available twice a day - in the mornings, mostly as a mid morning snack and in the evening at tea time. Most of these are deep fried ones and I've had many fond memories of enjoying some freshly made, piping hot snacks at small hotels outside my college or around town. In those days when people shopped around on the busy streets of Hampankatta, Mangalore's popular shopping area, it was customary for them to take a break and have a cuppa accompanied by some traditional snacks. Today's snack is one of those wonderful snacks that I had as a child along with others - I won't name all of them as I hope to try each and everyone of them in this series. 

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Bhapa Doi ~ Steamed (or Baked) Yogurt Dessert


Despite having a stock pile of recipes that I wanted to try for Easter I was simply unable to try them out in time. Some recipes needed tweaking and some needed better pictures to be clicked. In the midst of it all I randomly tried my hand at making a dessert to use up some leftover condensed milk from my homemade Nutella making session - after making two batches of it I had plenty of half used tins which had to be put to better use and I came across this recipe idea while browsing on the net. I referred to a few before zeroing on the measures which are my own as I had to make use of every drop of condensed milk. Thankfully my experiment didn't fail although the dessert was a tad too sweet for my liking but I guess with some extra milk added to it, it should serve the purpose next time. 

This dessert is a marvel. No wonder the Bongs are crazy over it. It is one lovely dessert to make with minimum effort and with simple ingredients! Originally a steamed dessert, you can easily make it in the oven if you have one and chill it overnight if you have a party the next day. Seriously, I love make ahead desserts, its just one less thing to do the next day. Plus, who doesn't like chilled desserts? While the term 'dessert' brings to mind the fancy western delights like mousses or cheesecakes or puddings or flans this one is as desi as it can be. If you skip the flavouring, all you need is milk, condensed milk and the most important and humble ingredient - yogurt (curds as we call it in India).

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Chicken Masala Fry ~ Appetizer or Side Dish!



The upcoming week is going to be a very busy one for me. Not just because the Holy Week has officially begun today but also because I am expecting guests who will be with us to celebrate Easter this year. I am really looking forward to having family over. Although I had planned many posts for Easter I am hardly able to steal sometime to do full justice to them so I guess I will roll them out one by one after the extended festivities end. Hopefully this week I will post another couple of recipes before Maundy Thursday after which I will be super busy at home and at the church. 

Today I suddenly decided to take the plunge and post a recipe before I go into hiberantion. I don't have much to type as my mind is currently on the pile of unfinished chores waiting for me, so let me jump straight to the recipe. Since I love bookmarking chicken recipes this one has been on my to-do list for a while. However, I wasn't really convinced whether the final result would be good enough to blog about but I was taken by surprise. Not only was this recipe different in its method it was damn delicious! The caramelised onions really added a unique flavour to the final dish. I only wish I had used spicier chillies but I guess if you stick to my recipe and the way I made it it is most suitable for people of all ages, especially little ones who can't take a lot of spice

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Paneer Kurma | Paneer Korma (Cottage Cheese in a Spicy Yogurt Gravy)


I know this sounds silly but I feel so triumphant today! I have finally made something out of paneer and it turned out great! You see, I never really tried making paneer at home as the husband wasn't too fond of it. The problem was that he had eaten the chewy sort, from his experience of eating out at places that perhaps used aged paneer which tastes absolutely rubbish (once you've begun to eat fresh paneer that is). Over the past few years I have tried convincing him to eat it but he wasn't too keen. I then decided to start preparing it at home as I felt that it was about time my kids got used to it. Paneer is a great meal option especially if you are a vegetarian and your intake of protein is limited to just lentils/dals/legumes. In my case, my son doesn't enjoy chicken anymore, fish and eggs are a no no with him and red meat is something we don't bring so often. What else can give him the nourishment he needs? Paneer and soya ofcourse. While I had prepared a few dishes with soya before, it was my first tryst with paneer. I didn't really have the time to make the paneer from scratch and plus I have had satisfactory results with the fresh paneer that we get here at the Lulu supermarket

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Mangalorean Plated Meal Series - Boshi# 18 - Mushroom Curry, Gule Sukhe, Salad & Neer Dosa


BOSHI# 18

Until now I thought presenting a pure veg boshi was a pain. Not anymore! I actually had fun putting this meal plan together as I felt the selection of items and flavours complemented each other very well. The mushrooms could very well be a meat replacement (in terms of their texture) - the health benefits of these are immense - they are a good source of lean protein and fibre, the black eyed peas is a good source of protein while the potatoes add to the carbs. To supplement this I have added freshly cut cucumbers to balance the intake of nutrients. All this is served with simple neer dosa/panpolay to make it one delicious yet simple lunch! 

I hope you give this boshi a try and let me know how you liked it! If you have tried any of my recipes please drop me an email at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com. I'd love to hear from you!

Do check the complete Boshi series here

RECIPES:

Monday, March 23, 2015

Mushroom Curry


I am back to another week of blogging after a pretty hectic yet fulfilling weekend. This week I will be posting the last few vegetarian recipes I have and I hope you've enjoyed the collection. When I am on the hunt for veg recipes there is never a dearth of people who share their favourite recipes with me. I happened to chat with my old friend from Mangalore who was part of the same choir at the church I went to. She now lives in Mysore and over the chat she told me how she loves veg food and having been transformed into vegetarian now has a big collection of recipes. Obviously I asked her to share a few with me and within a few minutes she emailed me her hit recipes - I am so grateful to her for having shared a variety of recipes from salads to pickles and everything in between! Thank you so much Joylyn for your generosity!

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Kapi Falhaar#1 ~ Godachi Kapi ~ Traditional Mangalorean Brewed Coffee Sweetened with Palm Jaggery


One of Mangalore's most traditional beverages is a freshly brewed coffee sweetened with palm jaggery (obtained from the Palmyra palm, commonly known as the 'Eerol/Irvol fruit tree). While some people prefer having it plain without milk (called as 'puti kapi') some add some creamy whole milk to it that helps create a beautiful blend of milky goodness. I was introduced to this version of the coffee (with palm jaggery) after I delivered my second baby a couple of years ago. Till then, I had only heard about the godachi kapi. The term 'god' stands for jaggery in Konkani. In Mangalore we popularly use two types of jaggery, the most common one is made from unrefined sugarcane juice (called as just 'god' or 'kobache god' where 'kobu' stands for sugarcane) and the other called as 'pele (pelem) /pelyache god or 'surai god' which is obtained from the palmyra tree. The stack of jaggery discs is called as the 'pelo' and 'surai' means one that is obtained from 'sur' or toddy. The third and less popular variety is the coconut palm jaggery called as 'narli god' which is obtained from the toddy of the coconut tree. They say that it is pretty hard to tell the difference between the last two as both are sold in stacks of 12-14 discs and look similar in colour and aroma. If I manage to unravel the mystery on my next trip to Mangalore I will definitely share the information with you.

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Corn Rice


Ever since we moved to Dubai we've increased our intake of corn, not because of any particular reason but just because of its availability and the fact that the kids love it. While I usually buy corn cobs regularly from the Farmers Market when it is in season I also like to stock up on frozen corn kernels as it turns out to be a perfectly handy option. My little one enjoys some kernels with some butter in it and the older fellow has always been a huge fan of steamed corn on the cob with some butter, chilli powder and lime juice slathered all over it. The two of them simply relish this healthy snack. 

Another great way of adding corn to our menu is in the form of this simple yet tasty, no fuss one pot meal. I usually make it when I am in a hurry to finish cooking and leave home on an errand. 

Sunday, March 15, 2015

Muska Baji ~ Drumstick Leaves Sukhe



Another traditional dish from Mangalore is a simple saute/sukka way of preparing drumstick leaves. Today, as I know it, not many people cook the leaves as they are not as popular as the drumsticks themselves which are widely used in South Indian cuisine, especially in the preparation of sambhar. My grandma had a drumstick tree in her backyard but I have no recollection of ever eating the cooked leaves. One of Roshan's relatives told me about the health benefits of the leaves and I've been a convert since then. 

The leaves apparently have been elevated to the status of a 'superfood' by the U.N and the Moringa trees have been used to combat malnutrition, especially among infants and nursing mothers. Moringa oleifera as it is known botanically has plenty of uses and goes by several common names such as moringa, drumstick tree, horseradish tree (the roots taste like horseradish), ben oil tree or benzoil tree. I was surprised to know that India is the largest producer of Moringa as it is native to the southern foothills of the Himalayas in northwestern India and is widely cultivated in tropical ares. Apart from its herbal uses it is also used for water purification and hand washing! Wow! Indeed a superfood.

Saturday, March 14, 2015

Pineapple Saasive | Ananas Sasam (No Cook Method) ~ Mangalorean Brahmin Style

During my growing up years in Mangalore almost every household that grew its own veggies on a small patch of land, usually a backyard garden, used to grow pineapples among other basic vegetables and fruits. It was nice to enjoy seasonal harvest throughout the year because apart from the fact that it was free, it was also organic. Although we didn't grown pineapples in our yard we did enjoy some fruit that was grown in our neighbour's yard which they occasionally shared with us. Honestly, I didn't care much for free goodies then, I never valued them until I left Mangalore and have had to purchase everything. 

Having grown up in a neighbourhood that had a good mix of cultures I have had the good fortune of tasting food from every community in Mangalore. We had Havyaka Brahmins who lived in the next compound, where I spent many a joyous hours of my childhood playing with the kids there. Amma as we called their mother reared cows so that the milk could be sold - a way to make two ends meet. Whenever I visited their house (which was daily, after school) I kept myself busy in the verandah or within the compound, playing endless games of digging the ground, making mud cakes and castles, chasing butterflies and playing with their crazy, ferocious mongrel, Tiger.