Thursday, July 16, 2015

Chicken Hyderabadi Biryani


A couple of months ago the hubby came across an easy biryani recipe which he wanted me to try out. Till the time I tried it I didn't consider biryani making an 'easy' process but I was stumped after I tried this one. The best part about this biryani is that the only time you spend is preparing the marination for the chicken and after that you just cook the rice, place it on the marinated chicken and cook it together on 'dum' and voila! a mouthwatering biryani is ready! If you want to make this biryani for a party and don't want to kill yourself in the kitchen you can marinate the chicken ahead of time and on the day just cook it along with the rice - so easy yeah?

I tried making this a couple of times as I wanted to perfect it and then I decided to post it just in time for Eid. For those who are celebrating it 'Eid Mubarak!' and may you be blessed richly by the Almighty! Spend precious time with your loved ones and do enjoy the festivities! 

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Oatmeal Buttermilk Bread #Breadbakers


I am back with another bread folks! This month's theme is oatmeal which I am sure everyone on our baking group welcomed. Since I had baked with oatmeal before I was looking forward to it using it again, this time in a bread. There were tons of recipes on the internet and I shortlisted two. The first one bombed very badly and with little time to experiment with the second recipe before I went on vacation I had to hurry up. The use of buttermilk in bread sounded so good to me that despite the numerous other recipes that I could have selected I decided to go with this one. Although I was baking bread two days in a row (which I rarely do), I had a gut feeling that this time my ingredients wouldn't go a waste and we'd have some delicious bread to munch on for the next few days. As expected, the combination of whole wheat and oatmeal was marvellous. I simply couldn't resist slicing the bread before it had cooled down - a big mistake! If you slice the bread too soon you risk them from drying up soon. The warm air that is trapped inside the loaf actually helps keep it soft and moist for longer. I quickly 'sealed' back the slice and crossed my fingers and hoped that it wouldn't be too dry. Luckily, the bread didn't last that long - we finished it off on the same day.

Friday, July 10, 2015

Kirathyaso Kasai - Herbal Decoction (Kashaya) of King of Bitters/Kirata Kaddi (Andrographis Paniculata) - Home Remedy

The above pic includes the freshly brewed decoction with leaves, this is just for a pictorial representation. The clear liquid needs to be consumed after straining out the leaves

While I was welcomed by the lush greenery on Mangalore's landscape last week, the heat was unbearable. Rains were intermittent, almost non existent and we prayed for a few showers every night to help us sleep less uncomfortably. As always I enjoyed the many sights of Mangalore - the vegetation growing wild, the old landmarks which bring back many memories and of course the food of this place which is the reason behind my blog. Last year when I was here my mum-in-law was brewing some kasai (kashaya) for herself from one of the most bitter herbs called as the 'kirathem'. When I tasted some, I almost died - the taste was just too bitter and strong, but then I was eager to know more about this plant and so she showed it to me. A few pictures were taken, information Googled and the post was prepared but I was never really inclined to post this recipe because there always seemed to be something more delicious that found its way to the blog. 

A year on, I've realised that the most important recipes are actually those that help forgive our sins and help undo at least some, if not all of our careless eating - of foods that are not really good for our health. Nature provides remedies for almost all ailments and I want to specially feature one of the most bitter of all herbs, the King of Bitters (Botanical name : Andrographis Paniculata). Most Mangaloreans I know (at least the older generation) have terrible memories of having had this bitter concoction during their childhood. It was customary and compulsory to have this decoction (kasai/kashaya as it is called in the local language) by the whole family as it was believed to ward off many ailments. People who had this kashaya seldom fell sick and I was really keen to carry this tradition forward.

Thursday, June 25, 2015

Kapi Falhaar#6 - Ragi Manni | Ragi Falooda (Finger Millet Pudding) ~Gluten Free & Vegan


I know that I have said this many many times before but one of the most satisfying aspects of blogging are the kind of people you get to 'meet' along the way and how they end up becoming a special part of your life. Over a period of time I have virtually met so many different kinds of people over social media. Some took detours along the way while many are still with me as my closest friends and confidantes. One such special friend is a person who knows to add cheer to everyone's life with her puns, jokes and positive outlook towards life . There are people who can joke about all and sundry and then those who can actually take a joke (on their own selves) like this person. So when she asked me for the recipe of the Ragi Manni which she had eaten at a restaurant in Bangalore I decided to give it a try. This was way back in 2012. A few recipes were found, tried and tested but over a period of time it was put on the back burner due.

Mangalorean Plated Meal Series - Boshi# 28 - Kane Jeere Miri, Gosalem Thel Piao, Pathrade Fry & Rice

BOSHI#28


Last Sunday's visit to the fish market saw us buying a nice variety of fish, most of which are my favourites - kane (lady fish), kube (clams/cockles), bangde (mackerels), tharle (sardines), pamplet (pomfrets), sungta (prawns - which I have just started to eat in small portions). We are literally having a seafood fest and gorging on so many dishes day after day much to the displeasure of our son. 

A couple of days ago I made the traditional jeere miri curry which has always been my favourite. Unfortunately the weather outside was playing havoc with my camera and I couldn't get too many shots - so posting what the best that I could grab within a few seconds and so the colour  of the curry doesn't look perfect. Since I had left the fish whole (which I later realised I shouldn't have), I struggled to 'boshi' it, cuz the kane demanded more space than I could give it! Finally I dished out the slimmest of the lot.

The addition of the pathrade fry is not typical of me as I generally don't like to crowd my plate with too many things but to lure the son into eating some fish curry I decided to fry up the pathrade I had prepared last week. Don't ask me where I got the colocasia leaves from, I made these with palak which is a great substitute when you are craving for pathrade! So what's stopping you now? Go make some!

Write to me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com and let me know how you like it, whether you've tried any of the boshis that I present and if yes, do send me a picture and I'll display it on my Facebook page!

Do check the complete Boshi series here

RECIPES:

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Kapi Falhaar#5 ~ Beetroot Bonda | Vegetable Bonda~ Mixed Vegetable Fritters


I am back with another Mangalorean favourite that aptly belongs to the Kapi Falhaar series - the Beetroot Bonda which is also known as the Vegetable or Mixed Veg Bonda in Mangalore. Basic bondas (or fritters) are made with a potato mash that is tempered with various seasonings and then formed into balls, coated with chickpea flour batter and deep fried till golden brown. They are then served with a variety of coconut chutneys or tomato ketchup or both. Since we are die hard fans of Mangalorean snacks, the husband and I never miss the chance of eating out at the various cafes and restaurants that dot Mangalore on our every visit. The potato or beetroot bonda is pretty much on our wish list everytime with the Goli Baje and Mangalore Buns topping the list every time. Last year when I visited Mangalore I requested my mum in law to make it for breakfast. I noted down her recipe and even took the pictures but since I wasn't too happy with the way the pictures turned out in the bleak light (thanks to the heavy rains) I decided to make them once I returned to Dubai. I made them a couple of times since then but was too lazy to note down the exact measures. Thanks to the Kapi Falhaar series, I have no more excuses to keep this recipe away from you any longer.

Saturday, June 20, 2015

Mocha Banana Bundt Cake


There are no prizes for guessing why I am adding another banana bread to my collection. Bananas that have no takers usually find their way into Mangalore buns or banana breads at my place. This time its a bundt with some ganache on it. And did I mention coffee? Well, its the perfect addition to this wonderful cake as it takes the cake to another level of deliciousness! My little daughter couldn't stop herself from this rare indulgence - she enjoyed the ganache more than anything. Since I love banana breads I literally wolfed down most of the pieces, the son and the husband limited themselves to a few pieces as one is not a fan of bananas in cakes and the other is not fond of chocolate frosting. Sigh! It's hard to please everyone these days!

Thursday, June 18, 2015

Mangalorean Plated Meal Series - Boshi# 27 - Pork Bafat with Yam & Radish, Tomato Saar, Beans Thel Piao

BOSHI#27


We like to cook something special on Sundays and since we hadn't cooked pork in a while I decided to bug the husband to make some pork bafat for me. This time he decided to add some yam (his favourite) and some radish (which we won't eat otherwise) to the curry to give it some extra taste. A lot of people in Mangalore add yam (sooran) or even raw bananas to pork not just for the taste but also to feed big families on a budget.  

I paired this with a simple french beans 'thel piao' and tomato saar and enjoyed the meal very much!

Write to me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com and let me know how you like it, whether you've tried any of the boshis that I present and if yes, do send me a picture and I'll display it on my Facebook page!

Do check the complete Boshi series here

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Pork Schezwan ~ When The Hubby Cooks!


One of my favourite items on a wedding menu back home is the pork schezwan. This Indo-Chinese dish is so much a part of Mangalorean weddings that every once in a while you will see it featured on the menu. Although a few people make it at home it pretty much remains to be a dish normally ordered from the caterer. Today many caterers in Mangalore cater to small parties at home with the number being as low as 12-15 and pork schezwan is usually a dish we like to order as everyone likes it so much back home.

Sometimes I wonder how this dish became a part of our cuisine - not the traditional one but more like an adapted one, the one that is filled with lovely dishes from around the world, those that are proudly presented on party menus to impress the young and old alike. Perhaps the few Chinese restaurants that everyone ate out at on special occasions contributed to this culture. Back when I was growing up, eating out was not a thing. We ate home cooked food and didn't really crave for take aways but slowly, as the trend picked up people started eating out, especially at Chinese restaurants (as there weren't any multi cuisine restaurants back then) and since most Mangaloreans love their pork as much as they love their fish they must have decided to bring the flavours back home and recreate the dishes to be enjoyed in the comfort of their home. 

Post Natal Recipe ~ Sambarachi Pez - Rice Gruel (Kanji) Flavoured with Spices


Ruchik Randhap is all about bringing you tried and tested recipes that have survived the passage of time. We believe in serving you recipes that are old (traditional) and new (contemporary/popular) ones too. In the quest to search and preserve our culinary heritage I have asked several people for their recipes. While some of them were hesitant, many were more than generous to part with their recipes. One such person was the lady who came to take care of my baby and me after my second delivery in 2012. She was a lively, fun loving, generous person who gave me many post natal recipes except the 'randho'. 

This particular preparation was new to me at that time but I was pretty interested in knowing how to make it so that I could share the recipe with other new moms and caregivers of new moms living outside India. Not everybody is able to hire the traditional caregivers so I thought it would be a good thing to post the recipe. However, over a period of time I forgot all about this collection of recipes that I had painstakingly collected. At some point although I was inclined to post the recipes I felt the pictures were not as good so hesitated. But today I realise that the recipes must go on the blog simply because I have spent so much time over them and plus if I don't post them when I still remember what the dish tasted like I never will. 

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Chicken Hyderabadi Biryani


A couple of months ago the hubby came across an easy biryani recipe which he wanted me to try out. Till the time I tried it I didn't consider biryani making an 'easy' process but I was stumped after I tried this one. The best part about this biryani is that the only time you spend is preparing the marination for the chicken and after that you just cook the rice, place it on the marinated chicken and cook it together on 'dum' and voila! a mouthwatering biryani is ready! If you want to make this biryani for a party and don't want to kill yourself in the kitchen you can marinate the chicken ahead of time and on the day just cook it along with the rice - so easy yeah?

I tried making this a couple of times as I wanted to perfect it and then I decided to post it just in time for Eid. For those who are celebrating it 'Eid Mubarak!' and may you be blessed richly by the Almighty! Spend precious time with your loved ones and do enjoy the festivities! 

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Oatmeal Buttermilk Bread #Breadbakers


I am back with another bread folks! This month's theme is oatmeal which I am sure everyone on our baking group welcomed. Since I had baked with oatmeal before I was looking forward to it using it again, this time in a bread. There were tons of recipes on the internet and I shortlisted two. The first one bombed very badly and with little time to experiment with the second recipe before I went on vacation I had to hurry up. The use of buttermilk in bread sounded so good to me that despite the numerous other recipes that I could have selected I decided to go with this one. Although I was baking bread two days in a row (which I rarely do), I had a gut feeling that this time my ingredients wouldn't go a waste and we'd have some delicious bread to munch on for the next few days. As expected, the combination of whole wheat and oatmeal was marvellous. I simply couldn't resist slicing the bread before it had cooled down - a big mistake! If you slice the bread too soon you risk them from drying up soon. The warm air that is trapped inside the loaf actually helps keep it soft and moist for longer. I quickly 'sealed' back the slice and crossed my fingers and hoped that it wouldn't be too dry. Luckily, the bread didn't last that long - we finished it off on the same day.

Friday, July 10, 2015

Kirathyaso Kasai - Herbal Decoction (Kashaya) of King of Bitters/Kirata Kaddi (Andrographis Paniculata) - Home Remedy

The above pic includes the freshly brewed decoction with leaves, this is just for a pictorial representation. The clear liquid needs to be consumed after straining out the leaves

While I was welcomed by the lush greenery on Mangalore's landscape last week, the heat was unbearable. Rains were intermittent, almost non existent and we prayed for a few showers every night to help us sleep less uncomfortably. As always I enjoyed the many sights of Mangalore - the vegetation growing wild, the old landmarks which bring back many memories and of course the food of this place which is the reason behind my blog. Last year when I was here my mum-in-law was brewing some kasai (kashaya) for herself from one of the most bitter herbs called as the 'kirathem'. When I tasted some, I almost died - the taste was just too bitter and strong, but then I was eager to know more about this plant and so she showed it to me. A few pictures were taken, information Googled and the post was prepared but I was never really inclined to post this recipe because there always seemed to be something more delicious that found its way to the blog. 

A year on, I've realised that the most important recipes are actually those that help forgive our sins and help undo at least some, if not all of our careless eating - of foods that are not really good for our health. Nature provides remedies for almost all ailments and I want to specially feature one of the most bitter of all herbs, the King of Bitters (Botanical name : Andrographis Paniculata). Most Mangaloreans I know (at least the older generation) have terrible memories of having had this bitter concoction during their childhood. It was customary and compulsory to have this decoction (kasai/kashaya as it is called in the local language) by the whole family as it was believed to ward off many ailments. People who had this kashaya seldom fell sick and I was really keen to carry this tradition forward.

Thursday, June 25, 2015

Kapi Falhaar#6 - Ragi Manni | Ragi Falooda (Finger Millet Pudding) ~Gluten Free & Vegan


I know that I have said this many many times before but one of the most satisfying aspects of blogging are the kind of people you get to 'meet' along the way and how they end up becoming a special part of your life. Over a period of time I have virtually met so many different kinds of people over social media. Some took detours along the way while many are still with me as my closest friends and confidantes. One such special friend is a person who knows to add cheer to everyone's life with her puns, jokes and positive outlook towards life . There are people who can joke about all and sundry and then those who can actually take a joke (on their own selves) like this person. So when she asked me for the recipe of the Ragi Manni which she had eaten at a restaurant in Bangalore I decided to give it a try. This was way back in 2012. A few recipes were found, tried and tested but over a period of time it was put on the back burner due.

Mangalorean Plated Meal Series - Boshi# 28 - Kane Jeere Miri, Gosalem Thel Piao, Pathrade Fry & Rice

BOSHI#28


Last Sunday's visit to the fish market saw us buying a nice variety of fish, most of which are my favourites - kane (lady fish), kube (clams/cockles), bangde (mackerels), tharle (sardines), pamplet (pomfrets), sungta (prawns - which I have just started to eat in small portions). We are literally having a seafood fest and gorging on so many dishes day after day much to the displeasure of our son. 

A couple of days ago I made the traditional jeere miri curry which has always been my favourite. Unfortunately the weather outside was playing havoc with my camera and I couldn't get too many shots - so posting what the best that I could grab within a few seconds and so the colour  of the curry doesn't look perfect. Since I had left the fish whole (which I later realised I shouldn't have), I struggled to 'boshi' it, cuz the kane demanded more space than I could give it! Finally I dished out the slimmest of the lot.

The addition of the pathrade fry is not typical of me as I generally don't like to crowd my plate with too many things but to lure the son into eating some fish curry I decided to fry up the pathrade I had prepared last week. Don't ask me where I got the colocasia leaves from, I made these with palak which is a great substitute when you are craving for pathrade! So what's stopping you now? Go make some!

Write to me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com and let me know how you like it, whether you've tried any of the boshis that I present and if yes, do send me a picture and I'll display it on my Facebook page!

Do check the complete Boshi series here

RECIPES:

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Kapi Falhaar#5 ~ Beetroot Bonda | Vegetable Bonda~ Mixed Vegetable Fritters


I am back with another Mangalorean favourite that aptly belongs to the Kapi Falhaar series - the Beetroot Bonda which is also known as the Vegetable or Mixed Veg Bonda in Mangalore. Basic bondas (or fritters) are made with a potato mash that is tempered with various seasonings and then formed into balls, coated with chickpea flour batter and deep fried till golden brown. They are then served with a variety of coconut chutneys or tomato ketchup or both. Since we are die hard fans of Mangalorean snacks, the husband and I never miss the chance of eating out at the various cafes and restaurants that dot Mangalore on our every visit. The potato or beetroot bonda is pretty much on our wish list everytime with the Goli Baje and Mangalore Buns topping the list every time. Last year when I visited Mangalore I requested my mum in law to make it for breakfast. I noted down her recipe and even took the pictures but since I wasn't too happy with the way the pictures turned out in the bleak light (thanks to the heavy rains) I decided to make them once I returned to Dubai. I made them a couple of times since then but was too lazy to note down the exact measures. Thanks to the Kapi Falhaar series, I have no more excuses to keep this recipe away from you any longer.

Saturday, June 20, 2015

Mocha Banana Bundt Cake


There are no prizes for guessing why I am adding another banana bread to my collection. Bananas that have no takers usually find their way into Mangalore buns or banana breads at my place. This time its a bundt with some ganache on it. And did I mention coffee? Well, its the perfect addition to this wonderful cake as it takes the cake to another level of deliciousness! My little daughter couldn't stop herself from this rare indulgence - she enjoyed the ganache more than anything. Since I love banana breads I literally wolfed down most of the pieces, the son and the husband limited themselves to a few pieces as one is not a fan of bananas in cakes and the other is not fond of chocolate frosting. Sigh! It's hard to please everyone these days!

Thursday, June 18, 2015

Mangalorean Plated Meal Series - Boshi# 27 - Pork Bafat with Yam & Radish, Tomato Saar, Beans Thel Piao

BOSHI#27


We like to cook something special on Sundays and since we hadn't cooked pork in a while I decided to bug the husband to make some pork bafat for me. This time he decided to add some yam (his favourite) and some radish (which we won't eat otherwise) to the curry to give it some extra taste. A lot of people in Mangalore add yam (sooran) or even raw bananas to pork not just for the taste but also to feed big families on a budget.  

I paired this with a simple french beans 'thel piao' and tomato saar and enjoyed the meal very much!

Write to me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com and let me know how you like it, whether you've tried any of the boshis that I present and if yes, do send me a picture and I'll display it on my Facebook page!

Do check the complete Boshi series here

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Pork Schezwan ~ When The Hubby Cooks!


One of my favourite items on a wedding menu back home is the pork schezwan. This Indo-Chinese dish is so much a part of Mangalorean weddings that every once in a while you will see it featured on the menu. Although a few people make it at home it pretty much remains to be a dish normally ordered from the caterer. Today many caterers in Mangalore cater to small parties at home with the number being as low as 12-15 and pork schezwan is usually a dish we like to order as everyone likes it so much back home.

Sometimes I wonder how this dish became a part of our cuisine - not the traditional one but more like an adapted one, the one that is filled with lovely dishes from around the world, those that are proudly presented on party menus to impress the young and old alike. Perhaps the few Chinese restaurants that everyone ate out at on special occasions contributed to this culture. Back when I was growing up, eating out was not a thing. We ate home cooked food and didn't really crave for take aways but slowly, as the trend picked up people started eating out, especially at Chinese restaurants (as there weren't any multi cuisine restaurants back then) and since most Mangaloreans love their pork as much as they love their fish they must have decided to bring the flavours back home and recreate the dishes to be enjoyed in the comfort of their home. 

Post Natal Recipe ~ Sambarachi Pez - Rice Gruel (Kanji) Flavoured with Spices


Ruchik Randhap is all about bringing you tried and tested recipes that have survived the passage of time. We believe in serving you recipes that are old (traditional) and new (contemporary/popular) ones too. In the quest to search and preserve our culinary heritage I have asked several people for their recipes. While some of them were hesitant, many were more than generous to part with their recipes. One such person was the lady who came to take care of my baby and me after my second delivery in 2012. She was a lively, fun loving, generous person who gave me many post natal recipes except the 'randho'. 

This particular preparation was new to me at that time but I was pretty interested in knowing how to make it so that I could share the recipe with other new moms and caregivers of new moms living outside India. Not everybody is able to hire the traditional caregivers so I thought it would be a good thing to post the recipe. However, over a period of time I forgot all about this collection of recipes that I had painstakingly collected. At some point although I was inclined to post the recipes I felt the pictures were not as good so hesitated. But today I realise that the recipes must go on the blog simply because I have spent so much time over them and plus if I don't post them when I still remember what the dish tasted like I never will.