Saturday, February 22, 2014

Sajjige Rotti/Rulavachi Bhakri (Semolina Pancake)


My blogging obsession has kind of caught up with most of my family members by now. While most of them generously share their recipes whenever I meet them some go a step ahead in collecting crockery or 'props' as I call them - kitchen utility items which are either of no use in their own kitchens or those that they chance upon during a trip to the supermarket. 

Last year when my mum had come to visit me in Mumbai, just before we moved to Dubai, I saw her going through my collection of Mangalorean cook books and making corrections to some of the recipes and then inserting little slips of recipe variations in addition to those printed in those books.
She also jotted down her own recipes on sheets of paper and quickly slipped them in between the pages. I love the little notes that she writes below each recipe. Her recipes are full of clarity and leave no room for doubt. She also gives cross references to incidents and mistakes that have possibly happened in the past. 


One such recipe was the Sajjige Rotti which she had jotted down. This was something she used to prepare as a tea time snack when I was in school. Somehow, years down the line it was put on the back burner and we never ate much of it. Just the other day I was wondering what I could prepare for my son's lunch box. It's always a pain to think of something that's both nutritious and quick for him to eat. I refrain from packing him store bought things with little nutrition. Since he has almost 9 hours to go between breakfast and lunch, I pack him 3 varieties of snacks to be eaten during breaks. The Sajjige Rotti was very well received as it was tasty, filling and easy to eat when rolled up.

Sajjige (semolina as it is called in Kannada in Mangalore) Rotti (pancake) is a typical Mangalorean breakfast/tea time snack that is prepared in homes and available in tea stalls (hotels) too. There are two variations of it, I will post the other one soon. For now, its the savoury version with bits of green chilli and curry leaves that makes it looks so inviting. 


Sajjige Rotti / Rulavachi Bhakri (Semolina Pancake)
(Printable Recipe)

Prep time: 15 mins | Cook time: 15-20 mins | Yield 8 small pancakes

Ingredients:
  • 1 cup fine semolina / bombay sooji/rawa
  • 1/2 cup whole wheat flour
  • 3 tablespoons freshly grated coconut
  • 1 small-medium (approx 1/2 cup) finely chopped onion
  • 2 small green chillies minced (adjust to taste)
  • 1 inch ginger grated or minced
  • 3 tablespoons thick curds/yogurt (use less if it is too sour)
  • 1-1/4 cups water (add in parts)
  • 4-5 curry leaves minced
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped coriander
  • 1-2 teaspoons sugar or powdered jaggery (optional but recommended)
  • salt to taste
  • ghee or oil for shallow frying
Method:
1. In a bowl add the semolina, wheat flour, grated coconut, onions, green chillies, ginger, coriander, curry leaves and mix well. Add the curds and water in parts to form a thick batter almost like idli batter. Add salt & sugar/jaggery to taste and keep aside for 15-20 mins. This will help the semolina to fluff up a bit and cook faster. After 20 minutes if you feel that the batter is too thick add a few teaspoons of water or curds at a time to loosen it up a bit.
2. Heat a cast iron tawa or a non stick pan and spread about 2 heaped tablespoons of the prepared batter in the centre of the pan. Using the back of the spoon/ladle gently help the batter to spread out using a circular motion.
3. Cover the pan and cook on a medium heat for approximately one minute. Open the lid, drizzle some ghee around the sides of the rotti and some drops over the surface and flip. Cook on the other side as well till golden brown. Remove and place in a hot box/casserole.
4. Serve hot with chutney, sambhar or simply a dollop of fresh butter.

14 comments:

  1. Yum :)
    I am goin to try this its nostalgic my mom used to make this ,never knew of adding the curd thanks Shireen for sharing :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Interesting. I have had Rava Rotti, but this is different.

    ReplyDelete
  3. @ Sangeetha & Minu: Thanks so much, hope you enjoy it!

    ReplyDelete
  4. wow...seems healthy nd tempting pix too

    ReplyDelete
  5. adding curds is something new to me..

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi Shireen
    My friend had mentioned about your website and I googled and there you are!!
    Tried Sajjige Rotti yesterday and it came out really nice. Fried few in the morning and brought some to work for bfast.
    I am sure I am going to make them more often. Thanks for sharing all your recipes with motivating beautiful pictures of the finished product. You are doing a great job. Appreciate all your efforts and time spent on this blog.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Isn't bombay rawa a refined form of wheat....almost like Maida?

    ReplyDelete
  8. @Kanthi: Thanks a ton for your lovely feedback :) I am so happy to know that you enjoyed the sajjige rotti and the other recipes and pictures too! I am encouraged with your lovely comment,. thanks so much!

    ReplyDelete
  9. @ Preethi: Well, Bombay rava is broken wheat to my knowledge, broken so fine that it looks white but does not undergo 'refining' or maybe doesn't get bleached like all purpose flour maida.

    This is the funda I got from Wikipedia "Modern milling of wheat into flour is a process that employs grooved steel rollers. The rollers are adjusted so that the space between them is slightly narrower than the width of the wheat kernels. As the wheat is fed into the mill, the rollers flake off the bran and germ while the starch (or endosperm) is cracked into coarse pieces in the process. Through sifting, these endosperm particles, the semolina, are separated from the bran. The semolina is then ground into flour. This greatly simplifies the process of separating the endosperm from the bran and germ, as well as making it possible to separate the endosperm into different grades because the inner part of the endosperm tends to break down into smaller pieces than the outer part"

    I am not sure if maida falls in the refined flour or bleached flour category. Here's the difference ""Refined flour" has had the germ and bran removed and is typically referred to as "white flour". "Bleached flour" is any refined flour with a whitening agent added."

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thanks S! Enough text not to feel very guilty abt bbay rawa next time.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I tried this yesterday for my kids lunch box and they loved it

    ReplyDelete
  12. Kids loved it, had packed for their school tiffin yesterday

    ReplyDelete
  13. @ Vanita: Thanks for the feedback! Glad your kids loved it :)

    ReplyDelete
  14. Cant wait to try it!!!! Mom used to make it and I loved to have it with Sugar :)
    Thanks Shireen
    Regards Sandeep

    ReplyDelete

I'd love to hear what you have to say about this post!

If you are unable to post a comment, please write to me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com

Last but not the least, my name is Shireen & not Ruchik :-)

Saturday, February 22, 2014

Sajjige Rotti/Rulavachi Bhakri (Semolina Pancake)


My blogging obsession has kind of caught up with most of my family members by now. While most of them generously share their recipes whenever I meet them some go a step ahead in collecting crockery or 'props' as I call them - kitchen utility items which are either of no use in their own kitchens or those that they chance upon during a trip to the supermarket. 

Last year when my mum had come to visit me in Mumbai, just before we moved to Dubai, I saw her going through my collection of Mangalorean cook books and making corrections to some of the recipes and then inserting little slips of recipe variations in addition to those printed in those books.
She also jotted down her own recipes on sheets of paper and quickly slipped them in between the pages. I love the little notes that she writes below each recipe. Her recipes are full of clarity and leave no room for doubt. She also gives cross references to incidents and mistakes that have possibly happened in the past. 


One such recipe was the Sajjige Rotti which she had jotted down. This was something she used to prepare as a tea time snack when I was in school. Somehow, years down the line it was put on the back burner and we never ate much of it. Just the other day I was wondering what I could prepare for my son's lunch box. It's always a pain to think of something that's both nutritious and quick for him to eat. I refrain from packing him store bought things with little nutrition. Since he has almost 9 hours to go between breakfast and lunch, I pack him 3 varieties of snacks to be eaten during breaks. The Sajjige Rotti was very well received as it was tasty, filling and easy to eat when rolled up.

Sajjige (semolina as it is called in Kannada in Mangalore) Rotti (pancake) is a typical Mangalorean breakfast/tea time snack that is prepared in homes and available in tea stalls (hotels) too. There are two variations of it, I will post the other one soon. For now, its the savoury version with bits of green chilli and curry leaves that makes it looks so inviting. 


Sajjige Rotti / Rulavachi Bhakri (Semolina Pancake)
(Printable Recipe)

Prep time: 15 mins | Cook time: 15-20 mins | Yield 8 small pancakes

Ingredients:
  • 1 cup fine semolina / bombay sooji/rawa
  • 1/2 cup whole wheat flour
  • 3 tablespoons freshly grated coconut
  • 1 small-medium (approx 1/2 cup) finely chopped onion
  • 2 small green chillies minced (adjust to taste)
  • 1 inch ginger grated or minced
  • 3 tablespoons thick curds/yogurt (use less if it is too sour)
  • 1-1/4 cups water (add in parts)
  • 4-5 curry leaves minced
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped coriander
  • 1-2 teaspoons sugar or powdered jaggery (optional but recommended)
  • salt to taste
  • ghee or oil for shallow frying
Method:
1. In a bowl add the semolina, wheat flour, grated coconut, onions, green chillies, ginger, coriander, curry leaves and mix well. Add the curds and water in parts to form a thick batter almost like idli batter. Add salt & sugar/jaggery to taste and keep aside for 15-20 mins. This will help the semolina to fluff up a bit and cook faster. After 20 minutes if you feel that the batter is too thick add a few teaspoons of water or curds at a time to loosen it up a bit.
2. Heat a cast iron tawa or a non stick pan and spread about 2 heaped tablespoons of the prepared batter in the centre of the pan. Using the back of the spoon/ladle gently help the batter to spread out using a circular motion.
3. Cover the pan and cook on a medium heat for approximately one minute. Open the lid, drizzle some ghee around the sides of the rotti and some drops over the surface and flip. Cook on the other side as well till golden brown. Remove and place in a hot box/casserole.
4. Serve hot with chutney, sambhar or simply a dollop of fresh butter.

14 comments:

  1. Yum :)
    I am goin to try this its nostalgic my mom used to make this ,never knew of adding the curd thanks Shireen for sharing :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Interesting. I have had Rava Rotti, but this is different.

    ReplyDelete
  3. @ Sangeetha & Minu: Thanks so much, hope you enjoy it!

    ReplyDelete
  4. wow...seems healthy nd tempting pix too

    ReplyDelete
  5. adding curds is something new to me..

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi Shireen
    My friend had mentioned about your website and I googled and there you are!!
    Tried Sajjige Rotti yesterday and it came out really nice. Fried few in the morning and brought some to work for bfast.
    I am sure I am going to make them more often. Thanks for sharing all your recipes with motivating beautiful pictures of the finished product. You are doing a great job. Appreciate all your efforts and time spent on this blog.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Isn't bombay rawa a refined form of wheat....almost like Maida?

    ReplyDelete
  8. @Kanthi: Thanks a ton for your lovely feedback :) I am so happy to know that you enjoyed the sajjige rotti and the other recipes and pictures too! I am encouraged with your lovely comment,. thanks so much!

    ReplyDelete
  9. @ Preethi: Well, Bombay rava is broken wheat to my knowledge, broken so fine that it looks white but does not undergo 'refining' or maybe doesn't get bleached like all purpose flour maida.

    This is the funda I got from Wikipedia "Modern milling of wheat into flour is a process that employs grooved steel rollers. The rollers are adjusted so that the space between them is slightly narrower than the width of the wheat kernels. As the wheat is fed into the mill, the rollers flake off the bran and germ while the starch (or endosperm) is cracked into coarse pieces in the process. Through sifting, these endosperm particles, the semolina, are separated from the bran. The semolina is then ground into flour. This greatly simplifies the process of separating the endosperm from the bran and germ, as well as making it possible to separate the endosperm into different grades because the inner part of the endosperm tends to break down into smaller pieces than the outer part"

    I am not sure if maida falls in the refined flour or bleached flour category. Here's the difference ""Refined flour" has had the germ and bran removed and is typically referred to as "white flour". "Bleached flour" is any refined flour with a whitening agent added."

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thanks S! Enough text not to feel very guilty abt bbay rawa next time.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I tried this yesterday for my kids lunch box and they loved it

    ReplyDelete
  12. Kids loved it, had packed for their school tiffin yesterday

    ReplyDelete
  13. @ Vanita: Thanks for the feedback! Glad your kids loved it :)

    ReplyDelete
  14. Cant wait to try it!!!! Mom used to make it and I loved to have it with Sugar :)
    Thanks Shireen
    Regards Sandeep

    ReplyDelete

I'd love to hear what you have to say about this post!

If you are unable to post a comment, please write to me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com

Last but not the least, my name is Shireen & not Ruchik :-)