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Saturday, January 4, 2014

Pandi Curry / Coorgi Pork - Kodagu /Coorg Style Pork Curry - When The Hubby Cooks!


A brand new year has just begun and I guess I am a little late in wishing all my readers a very Happy New Year 2014! Well, better late than never! As any good occasion needs to be celebrated I decided to post the recipe of Pandi Curry (pronounced as 'Pahnn-dhi' ) or Coorgi Style Pork curry that I have been contemplating to post since a very long time. The funny side of the story is that years ago when I was first offered this dish by a friend in college, prepared by her Coorgi neighbour I politely declined to taste it! Somehow the rich, dark colour didn't quite appeal to me and I wasn't so adventurous those days when it came to trying out new dishes. I simply stuck to known dishes and played safe. How I regret my decision. That was probably my only chance of having Pandi Curry made by a Coorgi. I could kick myself for being so silly.

A few years later when the blog came into existence and I did break out of my shell and got adventurous my first attempt at making this dish wasn't much of a success. I blamed it on the non availability of Kachampuli or Coorgi Vinegar, a rich dark liquid extract from a fruit called Kodampuli. It is also called as black vinegar and gives the dish its dark, rich colour and flavour. Coorg by the way is the anglicised name of Kodagu district in Karnataka. Madikeri/Mercara being its headquarters is a beautiful hillstation that most Mangaloreans have grown up visiting on holidays or to tend to their coffee estates. I have personally loved going there a couple of times although I don't recall having eating this famous dish during my trip. Coorg is famous for its beautiful hills, lovely weather, coffee estates, good looking men & women who are one of the most cultured and civilized people I have known.



Pandi Curry is pretty famous in Mangalore as our town is also home to plenty of Kodavas (native people of Kodagu) who usually come to Mangalore for their education. While we didn't have easy access to the recipe a few years ago, today if you wish to make it, many stores sell ready spice blends that help you make this dish in a jiffy. All you need is good quality pork with fat as fat is what helps lend this dish its amazing flavour along with the rich flavour of the spices. Kachampuli if not available can be substituted with thick tamarind juice or limes although the outcome of the final dish will greatly vary. Sadly some ingredients just don't have a suitable substitute. 


My man tried this dish with locally available Pork last month and not being completely satisfied with the result lugged more than 5kg of pork all the way from Mangalore last week during our super short X'mas visit there. This time around the preparation was simply stunning that it got over in no time. I just about managed to save a small bowl for the sake of the pictures. 

I wish all my readers a delicious, flavourful and aromatic New Year 2014!


Pandi Curry / Coorgi Pork
Prep time: 20 mins | Cook time: 20 mins | Serves 4
  • 1 kg pork with fat and skin, cut into cubes
  • 10 fat cloves of garlic finely chopped
  • 1 Inch ginger finely chopped
  • 3-4 green chilies (deseeded if required) finely chopped
  • 10-15 curry leaves
  • 1 big onion finely sliced
  • 1 tsp red chili powder
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric power
  • 1 cup of water
  • little oil
  • Salt to taste
  • 1/2-3/4th tablespoon Kachampuli (adjust to taste) * see notes for substitute
For the spice mix (to be dry roasted one by one and powdered)
  • 2 tablespoon coriander seeds
  • 1 inch cinnamon/cassia bark
  • 5-6 cloves
  • 10-15 peppercorns
  • 1-1/2 tablespoon cumin seeds
  • 1 teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 10-12 methi/fenugreek seeds (don't add too much or it will lend a bitter flavour)
  • 10-15 curry leaves (optional but recommended)
Method:
1. Cook the meat with garlic, green chilies, curry leaves, onions, red chili powder, turmeric powder, little oil, water and salt till it is tender (Slow cooking the meat is recommended, however in order to save time it can also be pressure cooked for not more than 2-3 whistles depending on the quality of meat used) * see notes
2. Add the spice mix to the cooked meat. You may add a little oil but it's optional as there will be enough fat released from the meat. Cook on a slow heat for about 5-10 minutes till the water evaporate, the fat separates and the spices have blended well with the meat. 
3. Do a quick taste check - add Kachampuli and more salt if required.
4. Remove from heat and serve hot with Coorgi rice rottis or neer dosa or rice.

Notes:
1. Kachampuli or Coorgi vinegar is derived from a fruit called as Kudampuli in Malayalam and Gambooge/Malabar Tamarind/Garcinia Cambogia in English. If you don't have kachampuli you may substitute it with equal quantity of thick tamarind juice or lime juice. Kachampuli is available in most stores in Mangalore and in Lulu Hypermarket in Dubai, U.A.E in the section which stocks up on foodstuff related to Malabar/Keralite cuisine.
2. To speed up the task a bit we pressure cooked the pork that we purchased from Mangalore. However I do not recommend that you to pressure cook pork that is available in the UAE (usually imported from Brazil) as it is extremely tender and may turn squishy when pressure cooked. Slow cooking is the safest bet when you have no idea about the quality/tenderness of the meat.

37 comments:

  1. @ Sanjay Vaidya and Tuskerwoods: Thanks so much!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Shireen, thanks for the corgi pork recipe, the other way you add more taste is put the onions ( cut in square) after pork is cooked along with sstraight slit green chillies. Tastes best :) .

    ReplyDelete
  3. @ I am the Patz: Thanks so much for your suggestion! That's the way we cut onions for Pork Bafat, a Mangalorean preparation. I am sure there is a reason why onions or other ingredients are cut in a certain way. I will definitely try out your method next time :) Thanks again!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Very nice recipe...thanku so much...

    ReplyDelete
  5. @ Sonia: Thanks so much :) Glad u liked it!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Looks delicious. Will try this at home.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Looks delicious. Will try this at home.

    ReplyDelete
  8. brilliant recipe. The closest i got cooking it as a Coorgi

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi Shireen,

    Would it be possible to make a video of your recipe and preparation and post it on youtube. It will be most helpful for people like us.

    ReplyDelete
  10. @ Rajesh Reddy: Thanks so much! Glad you liked it :)

    @ Vishwas: Hi, I will definitely try to take a video of the recipe, I have not yet considered making professional style videos but maybe I will give it a shot once I return back home to Dubai :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Shall make this tomorrow! Really appreciate this well-written, clear instructions! So rare in this field :-)

    ReplyDelete
  12. @Rajan: Thanks so much! I hope you liked it :) Do let me know how it turned out!

    ReplyDelete
  13. 100% Awesome! Being in Canada, I almost forgot how delicious Indian Pork curry is. Your recipe for Coorgi Pandi Curry has reminded me of how much I actually missed this delicacy staying where I am. Thanks Shireen!

    ReplyDelete
  14. @ Sundip: Thanks so much for those lovely words! I am glad you liked this recipe :)

    ReplyDelete
  15. Thank you Shireen ! This recipe is a masterpiece ! I did not have Coorgi Vinegar, so added lime...came out great.

    ReplyDelete
  16. @ Prashanth: That sounds terrific! I am so glad that you liked this dish :) Thnx for the feedback!

    ReplyDelete
  17. In India, Kachampuli can be ordered online through www.coorgshoppe.com. They also have the pork masala powder!

    ReplyDelete
  18. @ Dr Lirish Chinnappa: Thanks for the great info! I am sure my readers will benefit from it!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Thank you Shireen for sharing this recipe ! Turned out so delicious, my family loved it. I used the ordinary tamarind as I did'nt have Kachampuli. God bless !

    ReplyDelete
  20. @ Pearly: So glad you liked it! Thanks for the feedback!

    ReplyDelete
  21. My curry had become too sour.any idea how to repair this?

    ReplyDelete
  22. Great work!
    Broken down the intricacies.
    Blunt, in the face thing!

    ReplyDelete
  23. Great work!
    Broke down the intricacies.
    In your face flavour!!!
    Its great.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Hi Shireen, Thank you for posting these awesome recipes! Would you know what is the best cut for pandi curry and pork baffat?

    ReplyDelete
  25. @ Sandip: Any cut with fat on it works well for both the recipes! For baffat style pork I would highly recommend pork with fat

    ReplyDelete
  26. Hi Shireen, this recipe is simply amazing.. I think u n ur hubby shud actually co write the recipes regularly... U guys are amazing.. GOD BLESS

    ReplyDelete
  27. As Pandi Curry is a special and unique dish from Coorg, my question is in case if this Coorgi/Kodava Pandi Curry is made available as heat and eat. How would it sound. Any takers for this Heat and Eat Kodava Pandi Curry.

    ReplyDelete
  28. @ Chinnappa: I think that's a fantastic idea! I am sure there would be a lot of takers for the heat and heat version! You must start this venture :)

    ReplyDelete
  29. Hi Shireen... Thanks for this wonderful recipe, which I tried last week and sent to my sister's office colleagues... they truly loved it and said that this was the best of all the pork recipes which I had cooked for them before. The credit goes to you for sharing this recipe with us all... God Bless You always.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Hi shireen.. It looks v interesting..wanna try this recipe but we don't use pork.. Can we alter this with mutton ...

    ReplyDelete
  31. Hi shireen.this looks v interesting.. Wanna try it out but we don't use pork.. Can we alter this with mutton..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The pandi curry masala that we coorgis prepare can be used to prepare even mutton, chicken and fish curries. It really tastes very good.

      Delete
  32. @ Kavya: I have never tried it with mutton so I am not sure how it would taste, I am sure you could try it out though!

    ReplyDelete
  33. @ Unknown: Thanks so much for your lovely feedback! So glad to know that your sister's office colleagues liked it too!!

    ReplyDelete
  34. lived in Kodlipet (long time ago). nice to try this now.

    ReplyDelete

I'd love to hear what you have to say about this post!

If you are unable to post a comment, please write to me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com

Last but not the least, my name is Shireen & not Ruchik :-)

Saturday, January 4, 2014

Pandi Curry / Coorgi Pork - Kodagu /Coorg Style Pork Curry - When The Hubby Cooks!


A brand new year has just begun and I guess I am a little late in wishing all my readers a very Happy New Year 2014! Well, better late than never! As any good occasion needs to be celebrated I decided to post the recipe of Pandi Curry (pronounced as 'Pahnn-dhi' ) or Coorgi Style Pork curry that I have been contemplating to post since a very long time. The funny side of the story is that years ago when I was first offered this dish by a friend in college, prepared by her Coorgi neighbour I politely declined to taste it! Somehow the rich, dark colour didn't quite appeal to me and I wasn't so adventurous those days when it came to trying out new dishes. I simply stuck to known dishes and played safe. How I regret my decision. That was probably my only chance of having Pandi Curry made by a Coorgi. I could kick myself for being so silly.

A few years later when the blog came into existence and I did break out of my shell and got adventurous my first attempt at making this dish wasn't much of a success. I blamed it on the non availability of Kachampuli or Coorgi Vinegar, a rich dark liquid extract from a fruit called Kodampuli. It is also called as black vinegar and gives the dish its dark, rich colour and flavour. Coorg by the way is the anglicised name of Kodagu district in Karnataka. Madikeri/Mercara being its headquarters is a beautiful hillstation that most Mangaloreans have grown up visiting on holidays or to tend to their coffee estates. I have personally loved going there a couple of times although I don't recall having eating this famous dish during my trip. Coorg is famous for its beautiful hills, lovely weather, coffee estates, good looking men & women who are one of the most cultured and civilized people I have known.



Pandi Curry is pretty famous in Mangalore as our town is also home to plenty of Kodavas (native people of Kodagu) who usually come to Mangalore for their education. While we didn't have easy access to the recipe a few years ago, today if you wish to make it, many stores sell ready spice blends that help you make this dish in a jiffy. All you need is good quality pork with fat as fat is what helps lend this dish its amazing flavour along with the rich flavour of the spices. Kachampuli if not available can be substituted with thick tamarind juice or limes although the outcome of the final dish will greatly vary. Sadly some ingredients just don't have a suitable substitute. 


My man tried this dish with locally available Pork last month and not being completely satisfied with the result lugged more than 5kg of pork all the way from Mangalore last week during our super short X'mas visit there. This time around the preparation was simply stunning that it got over in no time. I just about managed to save a small bowl for the sake of the pictures. 

I wish all my readers a delicious, flavourful and aromatic New Year 2014!


Pandi Curry / Coorgi Pork
Prep time: 20 mins | Cook time: 20 mins | Serves 4
  • 1 kg pork with fat and skin, cut into cubes
  • 10 fat cloves of garlic finely chopped
  • 1 Inch ginger finely chopped
  • 3-4 green chilies (deseeded if required) finely chopped
  • 10-15 curry leaves
  • 1 big onion finely sliced
  • 1 tsp red chili powder
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric power
  • 1 cup of water
  • little oil
  • Salt to taste
  • 1/2-3/4th tablespoon Kachampuli (adjust to taste) * see notes for substitute
For the spice mix (to be dry roasted one by one and powdered)
  • 2 tablespoon coriander seeds
  • 1 inch cinnamon/cassia bark
  • 5-6 cloves
  • 10-15 peppercorns
  • 1-1/2 tablespoon cumin seeds
  • 1 teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 10-12 methi/fenugreek seeds (don't add too much or it will lend a bitter flavour)
  • 10-15 curry leaves (optional but recommended)
Method:
1. Cook the meat with garlic, green chilies, curry leaves, onions, red chili powder, turmeric powder, little oil, water and salt till it is tender (Slow cooking the meat is recommended, however in order to save time it can also be pressure cooked for not more than 2-3 whistles depending on the quality of meat used) * see notes
2. Add the spice mix to the cooked meat. You may add a little oil but it's optional as there will be enough fat released from the meat. Cook on a slow heat for about 5-10 minutes till the water evaporate, the fat separates and the spices have blended well with the meat. 
3. Do a quick taste check - add Kachampuli and more salt if required.
4. Remove from heat and serve hot with Coorgi rice rottis or neer dosa or rice.

Notes:
1. Kachampuli or Coorgi vinegar is derived from a fruit called as Kudampuli in Malayalam and Gambooge/Malabar Tamarind/Garcinia Cambogia in English. If you don't have kachampuli you may substitute it with equal quantity of thick tamarind juice or lime juice. Kachampuli is available in most stores in Mangalore and in Lulu Hypermarket in Dubai, U.A.E in the section which stocks up on foodstuff related to Malabar/Keralite cuisine.
2. To speed up the task a bit we pressure cooked the pork that we purchased from Mangalore. However I do not recommend that you to pressure cook pork that is available in the UAE (usually imported from Brazil) as it is extremely tender and may turn squishy when pressure cooked. Slow cooking is the safest bet when you have no idea about the quality/tenderness of the meat.

37 comments:

  1. @ Sanjay Vaidya and Tuskerwoods: Thanks so much!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Shireen, thanks for the corgi pork recipe, the other way you add more taste is put the onions ( cut in square) after pork is cooked along with sstraight slit green chillies. Tastes best :) .

    ReplyDelete
  3. @ I am the Patz: Thanks so much for your suggestion! That's the way we cut onions for Pork Bafat, a Mangalorean preparation. I am sure there is a reason why onions or other ingredients are cut in a certain way. I will definitely try out your method next time :) Thanks again!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Very nice recipe...thanku so much...

    ReplyDelete
  5. @ Sonia: Thanks so much :) Glad u liked it!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Looks delicious. Will try this at home.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Looks delicious. Will try this at home.

    ReplyDelete
  8. brilliant recipe. The closest i got cooking it as a Coorgi

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi Shireen,

    Would it be possible to make a video of your recipe and preparation and post it on youtube. It will be most helpful for people like us.

    ReplyDelete
  10. @ Rajesh Reddy: Thanks so much! Glad you liked it :)

    @ Vishwas: Hi, I will definitely try to take a video of the recipe, I have not yet considered making professional style videos but maybe I will give it a shot once I return back home to Dubai :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Shall make this tomorrow! Really appreciate this well-written, clear instructions! So rare in this field :-)

    ReplyDelete
  12. @Rajan: Thanks so much! I hope you liked it :) Do let me know how it turned out!

    ReplyDelete
  13. 100% Awesome! Being in Canada, I almost forgot how delicious Indian Pork curry is. Your recipe for Coorgi Pandi Curry has reminded me of how much I actually missed this delicacy staying where I am. Thanks Shireen!

    ReplyDelete
  14. @ Sundip: Thanks so much for those lovely words! I am glad you liked this recipe :)

    ReplyDelete
  15. Thank you Shireen ! This recipe is a masterpiece ! I did not have Coorgi Vinegar, so added lime...came out great.

    ReplyDelete
  16. @ Prashanth: That sounds terrific! I am so glad that you liked this dish :) Thnx for the feedback!

    ReplyDelete
  17. In India, Kachampuli can be ordered online through www.coorgshoppe.com. They also have the pork masala powder!

    ReplyDelete
  18. @ Dr Lirish Chinnappa: Thanks for the great info! I am sure my readers will benefit from it!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Thank you Shireen for sharing this recipe ! Turned out so delicious, my family loved it. I used the ordinary tamarind as I did'nt have Kachampuli. God bless !

    ReplyDelete
  20. @ Pearly: So glad you liked it! Thanks for the feedback!

    ReplyDelete
  21. My curry had become too sour.any idea how to repair this?

    ReplyDelete
  22. Great work!
    Broken down the intricacies.
    Blunt, in the face thing!

    ReplyDelete
  23. Great work!
    Broke down the intricacies.
    In your face flavour!!!
    Its great.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Hi Shireen, Thank you for posting these awesome recipes! Would you know what is the best cut for pandi curry and pork baffat?

    ReplyDelete
  25. @ Sandip: Any cut with fat on it works well for both the recipes! For baffat style pork I would highly recommend pork with fat

    ReplyDelete
  26. Hi Shireen, this recipe is simply amazing.. I think u n ur hubby shud actually co write the recipes regularly... U guys are amazing.. GOD BLESS

    ReplyDelete
  27. As Pandi Curry is a special and unique dish from Coorg, my question is in case if this Coorgi/Kodava Pandi Curry is made available as heat and eat. How would it sound. Any takers for this Heat and Eat Kodava Pandi Curry.

    ReplyDelete
  28. @ Chinnappa: I think that's a fantastic idea! I am sure there would be a lot of takers for the heat and heat version! You must start this venture :)

    ReplyDelete
  29. Hi Shireen... Thanks for this wonderful recipe, which I tried last week and sent to my sister's office colleagues... they truly loved it and said that this was the best of all the pork recipes which I had cooked for them before. The credit goes to you for sharing this recipe with us all... God Bless You always.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Hi shireen.. It looks v interesting..wanna try this recipe but we don't use pork.. Can we alter this with mutton ...

    ReplyDelete
  31. Hi shireen.this looks v interesting.. Wanna try it out but we don't use pork.. Can we alter this with mutton..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The pandi curry masala that we coorgis prepare can be used to prepare even mutton, chicken and fish curries. It really tastes very good.

      Delete
  32. @ Kavya: I have never tried it with mutton so I am not sure how it would taste, I am sure you could try it out though!

    ReplyDelete
  33. @ Unknown: Thanks so much for your lovely feedback! So glad to know that your sister's office colleagues liked it too!!

    ReplyDelete
  34. lived in Kodlipet (long time ago). nice to try this now.

    ReplyDelete

I'd love to hear what you have to say about this post!

If you are unable to post a comment, please write to me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com

Last but not the least, my name is Shireen & not Ruchik :-)