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Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Mangalore Buns

ಮಂಗಳೂರು ಬನ್ನ್ಸ್ 

As far as I know, the Mangalore buns are found only in Mangalore. Although you find a Mangalorean restaurant or Udupi hotel (as it's commonly known outside Mangalore/South Kanara) blooming in every nook & corner of the world, rarely do you see the Mangalore buns on the menu. Every die hard Mangalorean will vouch for the taste & instant gratification that this humble snack provides. Along with goli baje, another quintessential Mangalorean tea time snack, the Mangalore bun remains my all time favourite.


Mangalore Buns

Serves: 2-3


You Need:
  • All purpose flour (maida) - 1/4kg
  • Bananas - 2 small or 1 large
  • Curds - 2 tbsp
  • Sugar - 3 tbsp
  • Salt - 1/2 tsp
  • Soda bicarb - 1/4 tsp
  • Oil/ghee - 1 tbsp
  • Oil for frying
Method:
  1. In a large flat vessel (used for kneading dough) mix all the ingredients except maida (curds, sugar, soda bicarb, salt, oil/ghee & mashed bananas. Reserve about a quarter of the flour and add the rest in parts to the wet mixture. Knead to incorporate all the flour except the reserved one. Add very very little water (about a teaspoon or two) at a time ONLY if required to help knead. Actually adding more water will make a mess of your dough, so even wetting your palms while kneading is enough as the wet ingredients have enough moisture to help knead the dough. Use up the reserved flour if the dough is too pasty after adding the wet ingredients.
  2. Keep the dough ball covered for 8 hours or overnight in a warm place.
  3. Make small balls of dough & roll thick ( 5-6cms diameter - about the size of pooris)
  4. Deep fry until golden brown
  5. Serve hot with coconut chutney
Note: The buns keep for 3-4 days if stored in an airtight container. They can be eaten plain without any accompaniment


The first time I attempted to make Mangalore buns, they looked like this!
Recipe Source: The Mangalore Ladies Club Cookery Book

26 comments:

  1. Looks so tempting, want to give a try soon

    ReplyDelete
  2. You must try Sharmilee :) they are delicious :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. First time to ur lovely space...glad to follow u

    I had tasted these buns from my Mangalorean house owner while I was in Bangalore...Thanks for sharing the recipe...Need to give a try...

    http://www.panchamrutham.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  4. I tried this recipe and the buns turn out perfect. I substituted soda bicarb with yeast though.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thanks a lot for trying Nisha! So glad to know that they turned out right :) Yeast is a good idea - i'll try it whenever I run out of soda bicarb

    ReplyDelete
  6. mangalore buns awesome

    ReplyDelete
  7. Dear Shireen,

    Thank you for taking the time to help me re-discover and appreciate Mangalorean cuisine. I have tried a few of your recipes and they have turned out perfect everytime.

    Keep up the good work and keep them coming!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  8. @ Anonymous: Thanks so much for your feedback! I am so glad that you re-discovered Mangalorean cuisine through my blog and enjoyed the recipes too. Do keep trying and if & when possible click a picture and send it to me on ruchikrandhap@gmail.com, I will then post it in the Tried & Tested section of this blog and my Facebook page too!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi Shireen,

    I used to love these when I was younger. I was wondering if it is possible to bake them. I know they won't taste the same but it might be a healthier option. For how long and at what temperature would you let them rest in the oven at?

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hi Anonymous: I have tried baking them years ago but they didn't turn out as good as the deep fried version - or maybe that's just my opinion. Since I tried baking a few years ago I honestly don't recall what temperature/bake time I used. I guess you could try baking them at 200 degree C for maybe 10 minutes (I am not sure, just guessing - please use your judgement here) Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hey shereen,
    I guess the Mysore bananas is a perfect one for buns. Which one do you use here.
    Jos

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi,
    I guess the mysore the perfect match for buns is the Mysore balehannu. Which one do you prefer here.
    I have tried with the normal ellaki balehannu. It

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hi Jos, you can use mysore banana or elakki too. I have never used mysore variety as we don't get it here

    ReplyDelete
  14. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Doris, please elaborate your comment by emailing me on ruchikrandhap@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  16. Thanks Shireen. Satisfied my craving of mangalore buns by using your recipe. They turned out fab.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Thanks a ton Kavisha! Glad you liked the buns :) BTW, I am a huge fan of the many blogs you write. Loved the posts on your delivery experiences. You crack me up :D Thanks & keep up the good work :)

    ReplyDelete
  18. Keith loves these buns.. dad used to get everyday for him when we were in Mlore during diwali. I tried this recipe.. but I used wheat flour instead of maida. Trying to avoid maida as much as possible. They came out well. Keith keeps singing hot cross buns when I make them. makr

    ReplyDelete
  19. Hi
    i prepared this, it was so nice...Thank shireen

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hi Seema, thanks so much for your feedback :) glad to hear that you enjoyed it!

    ReplyDelete
  21. Hi Shireen. Can i use baking soda instead of sida bicarb? How much baking powder should i use?

    ReplyDelete
  22. @ Meghna: I am not sure I got your question. Baking Soda is the same as Soda Bi Carb. Baking powder is totally different. If you want to substitute baking soda with baking powder you can however baking powder is not as strong as soda. I guess you could use 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder (I have never tried substituting though)

    ReplyDelete
  23. Hi Shireen,

    I have tried these ones and they turned out slightly hard, not so soft as i would like them to be.
    However i am attempting them again tonight , do you think time factor is important or is 4-5 hours do the same trick ?
    I follow your blog religiously and has substituted my phone calls to mom back in India (in a good way though..haa )

    Thanks,
    Hazel Pinto, UK

    ReplyDelete
  24. @ Hazel: Sorry for the delay in responding...I think 4-5 hours is good enough. The buns may have turned hard if your dough was stiff.If the dough is stiff then rolling into pooris will be hard as the dough will be unyielding.

    Make sure you knead it sufficiently well for at least 5-6 minutes, moisten your palm with some ghee while kneading and I hope you have satisfactory results the next time over :) good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  25. Hi
    Can i use eno powder instead of soda bicarb?

    ReplyDelete
  26. Shilpa Kamath: I have never used eno so not sure. Eno is mostly used for thinner batters (like dosa) than a proper dough (like chapathi dough) as it facilitates rapid fermentation and rising (in a matter of seconds). If you use it then perhaps you don't need to keep the dough overnight but I really have no idea about how it will taste

    ReplyDelete

I'd love to hear what you have to say about this post!

If you are unable to post a comment, please write to me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com

Last but not the least, my name is Shireen & not Ruchik :-)

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Mangalore Buns

ಮಂಗಳೂರು ಬನ್ನ್ಸ್ 

As far as I know, the Mangalore buns are found only in Mangalore. Although you find a Mangalorean restaurant or Udupi hotel (as it's commonly known outside Mangalore/South Kanara) blooming in every nook & corner of the world, rarely do you see the Mangalore buns on the menu. Every die hard Mangalorean will vouch for the taste & instant gratification that this humble snack provides. Along with goli baje, another quintessential Mangalorean tea time snack, the Mangalore bun remains my all time favourite.


Mangalore Buns

Serves: 2-3


You Need:
  • All purpose flour (maida) - 1/4kg
  • Bananas - 2 small or 1 large
  • Curds - 2 tbsp
  • Sugar - 3 tbsp
  • Salt - 1/2 tsp
  • Soda bicarb - 1/4 tsp
  • Oil/ghee - 1 tbsp
  • Oil for frying
Method:
  1. In a large flat vessel (used for kneading dough) mix all the ingredients except maida (curds, sugar, soda bicarb, salt, oil/ghee & mashed bananas. Reserve about a quarter of the flour and add the rest in parts to the wet mixture. Knead to incorporate all the flour except the reserved one. Add very very little water (about a teaspoon or two) at a time ONLY if required to help knead. Actually adding more water will make a mess of your dough, so even wetting your palms while kneading is enough as the wet ingredients have enough moisture to help knead the dough. Use up the reserved flour if the dough is too pasty after adding the wet ingredients.
  2. Keep the dough ball covered for 8 hours or overnight in a warm place.
  3. Make small balls of dough & roll thick ( 5-6cms diameter - about the size of pooris)
  4. Deep fry until golden brown
  5. Serve hot with coconut chutney
Note: The buns keep for 3-4 days if stored in an airtight container. They can be eaten plain without any accompaniment


The first time I attempted to make Mangalore buns, they looked like this!
Recipe Source: The Mangalore Ladies Club Cookery Book

26 comments:

  1. Looks so tempting, want to give a try soon

    ReplyDelete
  2. You must try Sharmilee :) they are delicious :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. First time to ur lovely space...glad to follow u

    I had tasted these buns from my Mangalorean house owner while I was in Bangalore...Thanks for sharing the recipe...Need to give a try...

    http://www.panchamrutham.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  4. I tried this recipe and the buns turn out perfect. I substituted soda bicarb with yeast though.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thanks a lot for trying Nisha! So glad to know that they turned out right :) Yeast is a good idea - i'll try it whenever I run out of soda bicarb

    ReplyDelete
  6. mangalore buns awesome

    ReplyDelete
  7. Dear Shireen,

    Thank you for taking the time to help me re-discover and appreciate Mangalorean cuisine. I have tried a few of your recipes and they have turned out perfect everytime.

    Keep up the good work and keep them coming!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  8. @ Anonymous: Thanks so much for your feedback! I am so glad that you re-discovered Mangalorean cuisine through my blog and enjoyed the recipes too. Do keep trying and if & when possible click a picture and send it to me on ruchikrandhap@gmail.com, I will then post it in the Tried & Tested section of this blog and my Facebook page too!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi Shireen,

    I used to love these when I was younger. I was wondering if it is possible to bake them. I know they won't taste the same but it might be a healthier option. For how long and at what temperature would you let them rest in the oven at?

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hi Anonymous: I have tried baking them years ago but they didn't turn out as good as the deep fried version - or maybe that's just my opinion. Since I tried baking a few years ago I honestly don't recall what temperature/bake time I used. I guess you could try baking them at 200 degree C for maybe 10 minutes (I am not sure, just guessing - please use your judgement here) Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hey shereen,
    I guess the Mysore bananas is a perfect one for buns. Which one do you use here.
    Jos

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi,
    I guess the mysore the perfect match for buns is the Mysore balehannu. Which one do you prefer here.
    I have tried with the normal ellaki balehannu. It

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hi Jos, you can use mysore banana or elakki too. I have never used mysore variety as we don't get it here

    ReplyDelete
  14. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Doris, please elaborate your comment by emailing me on ruchikrandhap@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  16. Thanks Shireen. Satisfied my craving of mangalore buns by using your recipe. They turned out fab.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Thanks a ton Kavisha! Glad you liked the buns :) BTW, I am a huge fan of the many blogs you write. Loved the posts on your delivery experiences. You crack me up :D Thanks & keep up the good work :)

    ReplyDelete
  18. Keith loves these buns.. dad used to get everyday for him when we were in Mlore during diwali. I tried this recipe.. but I used wheat flour instead of maida. Trying to avoid maida as much as possible. They came out well. Keith keeps singing hot cross buns when I make them. makr

    ReplyDelete
  19. Hi
    i prepared this, it was so nice...Thank shireen

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hi Seema, thanks so much for your feedback :) glad to hear that you enjoyed it!

    ReplyDelete
  21. Hi Shireen. Can i use baking soda instead of sida bicarb? How much baking powder should i use?

    ReplyDelete
  22. @ Meghna: I am not sure I got your question. Baking Soda is the same as Soda Bi Carb. Baking powder is totally different. If you want to substitute baking soda with baking powder you can however baking powder is not as strong as soda. I guess you could use 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder (I have never tried substituting though)

    ReplyDelete
  23. Hi Shireen,

    I have tried these ones and they turned out slightly hard, not so soft as i would like them to be.
    However i am attempting them again tonight , do you think time factor is important or is 4-5 hours do the same trick ?
    I follow your blog religiously and has substituted my phone calls to mom back in India (in a good way though..haa )

    Thanks,
    Hazel Pinto, UK

    ReplyDelete
  24. @ Hazel: Sorry for the delay in responding...I think 4-5 hours is good enough. The buns may have turned hard if your dough was stiff.If the dough is stiff then rolling into pooris will be hard as the dough will be unyielding.

    Make sure you knead it sufficiently well for at least 5-6 minutes, moisten your palm with some ghee while kneading and I hope you have satisfactory results the next time over :) good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  25. Hi
    Can i use eno powder instead of soda bicarb?

    ReplyDelete
  26. Shilpa Kamath: I have never used eno so not sure. Eno is mostly used for thinner batters (like dosa) than a proper dough (like chapathi dough) as it facilitates rapid fermentation and rising (in a matter of seconds). If you use it then perhaps you don't need to keep the dough overnight but I really have no idea about how it will taste

    ReplyDelete

I'd love to hear what you have to say about this post!

If you are unable to post a comment, please write to me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com

Last but not the least, my name is Shireen & not Ruchik :-)