Monday, July 25, 2011

Bangude Ghassi (Bunt Style Spicy Mackerel Curry)

Last week I went hunting for some fish and thanks to the torrential rains, there wasn't much on display to be happy about. Just the usual fare - Mackerels, Pomfrets, King Fish (Surmai), Indian Salmon (Rawas), Prawns & Crabs. Since I don't eat the latter two (yeah, it's such a pity, but I am allergic to these crustaceous babies although thankfully not allergic to Clams & Squid ), I ended up buying whatever was on offer. Mackerels for me, Prawns for the husband and Pomfrets for the toddler (although he's the best among the three of us - eats fish with as much passion as a fisherman would fish!)


Since it is human nature to complain, it is but natural to complain about the scorching heat during the Summer and the crazy rains during the Monsoons - and also wail that there is no fish as fishing boats stay put (most times). Most of us fish lovers end up eating the same type of fish week after week or just seek more carnivorous options such as white & red meat besides eggs. Since we don't bring a lot of red meat regularly and Chicken becomes a bore if eaten more than twice a week, I decided to play around with some recipes for the fish sitting in my freezer. I didn't have to hunt too much, for I had already tried Charishma's recipes before, so I blindly followed her instructions to make this gorgeous Mackerel curry - a famous Bunt version called the Bangude Ghassi - oh so spicy and perfect for a rainy day when everything outside looks bleak and depressing. 

This curry brought a lot of flavour and colour into my day and we thoroughly enjoyed it. The blend of spices gives it the required punch (if you are not used to spicy food - the spice just 'hits' you!) and the fragrance is simply 'wow'. For those of you who wish to know the difference between the way Bunts make their curries and the way we Catholics make it is that they make use of Fenugreek (Methi) & Carrom (Ajwain) in a majority of fish and meat dishes which makes it distinctly flavourful and fragrant. Mangalorean Catholic cuisine has a lot of Portuguese/Goan influences which makes our food comparitively a bit on the sweetish/blandish side with spice levels that are drastically toned down. So a majority of folks I know from the heart of Mangalore will grab a glass of water and sip it down in between an extra spicy meal. So in short, Bunt cuisine is to me what Andhra cuisine is like to the rest of India - Spicy, fragrant, flavourful, finger lickin' good and makes you ask for MORE! That reminds me that I ought to try some Andhra recipes soon, but for now its Bangude Ghassi for you!


Bangude Ghassi
print this


You Need:
  • 6 small Mackerels (about 450-500gm)
  • 5-6 curry leaves
  • salt to taste
For the masala
  • 1 small onion
  • 3 tbsp grated coconut 
  • 1 level tsp coriander
  • 1 pinch cumin seeds (jeera)
  • 1 pinch fenugreek seeds (methi)
  • 1 pinch carrom seeds (ajwain)
  • 6 peppercorns
  • 3 long dry chillies (Bedgi/Kumti/Kaddi)*see note
  • 3 short red chillies (Harekala)* see note
  • 1 green chilli (increase it to 2 chillies as per your spice tolerance)
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric pwd
  • 1/4 inch ginger
  • 1 marble size ball tamarind (or about 3/4th tsp pulp/paste)
For tempering/fon/tadka/bagar
  • 4 cloves of garlic (with skin) crushed
  • 2 tsp oil
Note:
1. You can use a mix of Bedgi and Kashmiri chillies if you are unable to find the Harekala/short chillies which are used for the spice. Kashmiri chillies give the colour and Bedgi (Byadge) are medium spicy. Click here to see the pictures

Method:
1. Descale and thoroughly clean the Mackerels and allow to drain in a colander.
2. Dry roast all the ingredients (except the ginger and tamarind) mentioned in 'For the masala' one by one and then grind to a paste (needn't be fine) using a little water.
3. In a pan place the fish, salt to taste and curry leaves and add the masala. Add about 1-1/2 cups of water (or less if you wish it a bit thick). Gently turn the vessel and shake it to enable the masala to mix with the water. Avoid using a spoon. Bring the gravy to a boil
4. When the gravy has come to a full boil, turn off the flame and in another smaller pan heat the oil for tempering and when it is hot, toss in crushed garlic with skin and stir for 3-4 seconds before adding it to the gravy



15 comments:

  1. hello again Shireen,
    Yes I am exposed to cooking with coconut milk. I come from the Philippines and we have dishes cooked with coconut milk. My family loves Indian food too. Our bestest friends in Florida are from Banglore and we enjoyed having dinner at their place as much as they did with us too.
    Thanks for the kind words. I'm glad we bumped into each other. I truly hope that we could become friends virtually. Do you have a twitter account? just wondering. You could find me there too hehe. take care now,
    malou

    ReplyDelete
  2. this is totally new to me...looks yum

    ReplyDelete
  3. looks good shireen, amazing color
    charishma

    ReplyDelete
  4. Looks very yummy....
    www.savitharajsspiceland.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  5. Very spicy and lavish looking fish curry. Wonderfully prepared.

    Deepa
    Hamaree Rasoi

    ReplyDelete
  6. The color is enticing ~ a great blend of ingredients n the outcome is truly awesome!
    US Masala

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hey Sherry!!!

    Tried this recipe today... yummmm... thank u so much for this blog... this is a great help for me when i m bored cooking the same old recipes. mmmuuuaaahhhh

    ReplyDelete
  8. Thanks Ashu!!! So glad to hear that you liked the ghassi!! Enjoy!!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hey Shireen!! Guess what!!! I was looking for Mangalorean style Mackerel curry and the first recipe that popped up was yours!!! Congrats.. Im feeling so proud!!! :) Sandeep

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thanks Sandeep!! Sounds terrific!! Hope u made it :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Shireen pls can you post some pictures of chillies & mention their names below b'coz i'm always confused abt these chillies & especially yr curries their colour is really mind blowing since i'm in kwt & i've got no idea regarding these chillies only i know these kashmiri & short chillies whn i go thru yr receipes you have mentioned different types of chillies for fish curries. Anu

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi Anu, please go through this link...i hope the pictures will clear all your doubts about the chillies I use and mention in my recipes https://sites.google.com/site/ruchikrandhap/long-red-chillies-kumti-bedgi-byadge-kundapur

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hi, I tried your recipes. Its just wonderful. My hubby manglorian and I'm maharashtrian and there is no one who can teach me the manglorian dishes. My hubby always miss his mother recipes. I thankful to you for everything. I'm really happy because of you share special traditional mangloreian recipes. Thanksssssssssssssssssssssss Loooooooooooooooooooooot .

    ReplyDelete
  14. Hi.. I was cooking bangada for the first time and was very anxious , how it will turn out, but i followed your recipe and it turned out excellent! Thankyou so much. Even my husband appreciated. He is very particular about taste and I am happy that I could please him! Please do post more mangalorean dishes so that I can keep making tasty food. Keep it up! Thanks a ton!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hi Vandana: Thanks so much for your feedback! Glad to hear that you & your hubby liked this dish! Pls stay tuned for more recipes :)

    ReplyDelete

I'd love to hear what you have to say about this post!

If you are unable to post a comment, please write to me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com

Last but not the least, my name is Shireen & not Ruchik :-)

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Monday, July 25, 2011

Bangude Ghassi (Bunt Style Spicy Mackerel Curry)

Last week I went hunting for some fish and thanks to the torrential rains, there wasn't much on display to be happy about. Just the usual fare - Mackerels, Pomfrets, King Fish (Surmai), Indian Salmon (Rawas), Prawns & Crabs. Since I don't eat the latter two (yeah, it's such a pity, but I am allergic to these crustaceous babies although thankfully not allergic to Clams & Squid ), I ended up buying whatever was on offer. Mackerels for me, Prawns for the husband and Pomfrets for the toddler (although he's the best among the three of us - eats fish with as much passion as a fisherman would fish!)


Since it is human nature to complain, it is but natural to complain about the scorching heat during the Summer and the crazy rains during the Monsoons - and also wail that there is no fish as fishing boats stay put (most times). Most of us fish lovers end up eating the same type of fish week after week or just seek more carnivorous options such as white & red meat besides eggs. Since we don't bring a lot of red meat regularly and Chicken becomes a bore if eaten more than twice a week, I decided to play around with some recipes for the fish sitting in my freezer. I didn't have to hunt too much, for I had already tried Charishma's recipes before, so I blindly followed her instructions to make this gorgeous Mackerel curry - a famous Bunt version called the Bangude Ghassi - oh so spicy and perfect for a rainy day when everything outside looks bleak and depressing. 

This curry brought a lot of flavour and colour into my day and we thoroughly enjoyed it. The blend of spices gives it the required punch (if you are not used to spicy food - the spice just 'hits' you!) and the fragrance is simply 'wow'. For those of you who wish to know the difference between the way Bunts make their curries and the way we Catholics make it is that they make use of Fenugreek (Methi) & Carrom (Ajwain) in a majority of fish and meat dishes which makes it distinctly flavourful and fragrant. Mangalorean Catholic cuisine has a lot of Portuguese/Goan influences which makes our food comparitively a bit on the sweetish/blandish side with spice levels that are drastically toned down. So a majority of folks I know from the heart of Mangalore will grab a glass of water and sip it down in between an extra spicy meal. So in short, Bunt cuisine is to me what Andhra cuisine is like to the rest of India - Spicy, fragrant, flavourful, finger lickin' good and makes you ask for MORE! That reminds me that I ought to try some Andhra recipes soon, but for now its Bangude Ghassi for you!


Bangude Ghassi
print this


You Need:
  • 6 small Mackerels (about 450-500gm)
  • 5-6 curry leaves
  • salt to taste
For the masala
  • 1 small onion
  • 3 tbsp grated coconut 
  • 1 level tsp coriander
  • 1 pinch cumin seeds (jeera)
  • 1 pinch fenugreek seeds (methi)
  • 1 pinch carrom seeds (ajwain)
  • 6 peppercorns
  • 3 long dry chillies (Bedgi/Kumti/Kaddi)*see note
  • 3 short red chillies (Harekala)* see note
  • 1 green chilli (increase it to 2 chillies as per your spice tolerance)
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric pwd
  • 1/4 inch ginger
  • 1 marble size ball tamarind (or about 3/4th tsp pulp/paste)
For tempering/fon/tadka/bagar
  • 4 cloves of garlic (with skin) crushed
  • 2 tsp oil
Note:
1. You can use a mix of Bedgi and Kashmiri chillies if you are unable to find the Harekala/short chillies which are used for the spice. Kashmiri chillies give the colour and Bedgi (Byadge) are medium spicy. Click here to see the pictures

Method:
1. Descale and thoroughly clean the Mackerels and allow to drain in a colander.
2. Dry roast all the ingredients (except the ginger and tamarind) mentioned in 'For the masala' one by one and then grind to a paste (needn't be fine) using a little water.
3. In a pan place the fish, salt to taste and curry leaves and add the masala. Add about 1-1/2 cups of water (or less if you wish it a bit thick). Gently turn the vessel and shake it to enable the masala to mix with the water. Avoid using a spoon. Bring the gravy to a boil
4. When the gravy has come to a full boil, turn off the flame and in another smaller pan heat the oil for tempering and when it is hot, toss in crushed garlic with skin and stir for 3-4 seconds before adding it to the gravy



15 comments:

  1. hello again Shireen,
    Yes I am exposed to cooking with coconut milk. I come from the Philippines and we have dishes cooked with coconut milk. My family loves Indian food too. Our bestest friends in Florida are from Banglore and we enjoyed having dinner at their place as much as they did with us too.
    Thanks for the kind words. I'm glad we bumped into each other. I truly hope that we could become friends virtually. Do you have a twitter account? just wondering. You could find me there too hehe. take care now,
    malou

    ReplyDelete
  2. this is totally new to me...looks yum

    ReplyDelete
  3. looks good shireen, amazing color
    charishma

    ReplyDelete
  4. Looks very yummy....
    www.savitharajsspiceland.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  5. Very spicy and lavish looking fish curry. Wonderfully prepared.

    Deepa
    Hamaree Rasoi

    ReplyDelete
  6. The color is enticing ~ a great blend of ingredients n the outcome is truly awesome!
    US Masala

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hey Sherry!!!

    Tried this recipe today... yummmm... thank u so much for this blog... this is a great help for me when i m bored cooking the same old recipes. mmmuuuaaahhhh

    ReplyDelete
  8. Thanks Ashu!!! So glad to hear that you liked the ghassi!! Enjoy!!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hey Shireen!! Guess what!!! I was looking for Mangalorean style Mackerel curry and the first recipe that popped up was yours!!! Congrats.. Im feeling so proud!!! :) Sandeep

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thanks Sandeep!! Sounds terrific!! Hope u made it :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Shireen pls can you post some pictures of chillies & mention their names below b'coz i'm always confused abt these chillies & especially yr curries their colour is really mind blowing since i'm in kwt & i've got no idea regarding these chillies only i know these kashmiri & short chillies whn i go thru yr receipes you have mentioned different types of chillies for fish curries. Anu

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi Anu, please go through this link...i hope the pictures will clear all your doubts about the chillies I use and mention in my recipes https://sites.google.com/site/ruchikrandhap/long-red-chillies-kumti-bedgi-byadge-kundapur

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hi, I tried your recipes. Its just wonderful. My hubby manglorian and I'm maharashtrian and there is no one who can teach me the manglorian dishes. My hubby always miss his mother recipes. I thankful to you for everything. I'm really happy because of you share special traditional mangloreian recipes. Thanksssssssssssssssssssssss Loooooooooooooooooooooot .

    ReplyDelete
  14. Hi.. I was cooking bangada for the first time and was very anxious , how it will turn out, but i followed your recipe and it turned out excellent! Thankyou so much. Even my husband appreciated. He is very particular about taste and I am happy that I could please him! Please do post more mangalorean dishes so that I can keep making tasty food. Keep it up! Thanks a ton!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hi Vandana: Thanks so much for your feedback! Glad to hear that you & your hubby liked this dish! Pls stay tuned for more recipes :)

    ReplyDelete

I'd love to hear what you have to say about this post!

If you are unable to post a comment, please write to me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com

Last but not the least, my name is Shireen & not Ruchik :-)