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Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Sungta Ani Deeviso Guzo - Mangalorean Style Prawn and Breadfruit Curry


In the past few weeks the blog has seen a surge in the number of prawn recipes, isn't it? I realised this when I was busy editing the pictures of this recipe which I had tried out a few months ago and forgotten to post. Thanks to the fact that I am now able to eat prawns without a hitch (thank God for that!) we bring prawns more often and the kids are enjoying them too. I have been trying out various recipes and it's like I am making up for all the years that I couldn't enjoy them. 

Combo curries are very popular in Mangalore, especially those that include fresh or dried prawns. Most of our curries are a way of getting some sort of protein and a vegetable together in a curry to be served with plain rice. Although in comparison to what today's generation is used to eating, these dishes are laborious, the taste is unmatched and truly an experience to be indulged in at least occasionally.



I found this recipe while flipping through J.B Lobo's 'Sambardo' and adapted it minimally. If you don't get fresh prawns you can make this dish with dried ones too. Just make sure you wash them properly to get rid of the fishy smell (unless you prefer them that way)

Do write in at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com and let me know if you've tried and liked this recipe!




Sungta Ani Deeviso Guzo - Mangalorean Style Prawn and Breadfruit Curry

Ingredients:
  • 350-400 grams prawns, shelled and deveined
  • 300-350 grams (approx 1/2 of a medium sized) breadfruit, peeled and pith removed * see notes for substitute
For the masala:
  • 5-6 long dry red chillies (de seed to tone down the spice) (adjust to taste)
  • 1 medium sized onion, roughly chopped
  • 1 tablespoon coriander seeds 
  • 1/2 teaspoon fenugreek (methi) seeds
  • 3 fat cloves of garlic
  • 1/4 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 marble sized ball of tamarind
  • 1 cup grated coconut
  • Oil
For the tempering:
  • 1 tablespoon oil (preferably coconut)
  • 1/2 teaspoon mustard
  • 6-7 curry leaves
Method:
1. Rinse the prawns in salt water, refresh and drain
2. Heat a tablespoon of oil in a small frying pan and except the tamarind and turmeric powder fry all the ingredients mentioned under 'For the masala' one by one. Remove onto a plate and allow to cool then grind to a fine paste using a little water. Remove the masala and rinse the grinder jar with 1/2 cup of water and reserve it.
3. Cut the breadfruit into medium sized chunks and place in a pan. Add enough water (approx a cup) and salt to taste and cook till half cooked. Keep an eye out so that it doesn't overcook and turn mushy. 
4. Add the prawns, the ground masala paste, the reserved masala water and salt to taste. Add a little extra water to adjust the consistency of the gravy. Bring the curry to a boil and then simmer until the prawns are cooked. The breadfruit would also be cooked by then. Turn off the heat.
5. To prepare the seasoning, heat oil in a small pan and toss in the mustard. When it stops spluttering add the curry leaves and let them sizzle for a couple of seconds before pouring the mixture into the curry. Cover the pan immediately 
6. Serve hot with rice.

Notes:
Breadfruit is also called as Jeegujje in Tulu/Kannada and Neer Phanas in Marathi and some dialects of Konkani along the West coast of India (Maharashtra/Goa). If you live outside India try looking for it at your nearest Asian store. Most Sri Lankan stores may have it. If the fresh one is unavailable you may use the tinned fruit or even substitute it with tinned raw jackfruit or potatoes

4 comments:

  1. Hi Shireen,
    Would love to try this recipe. But what is 'breadfruit'? Do you know its Marathi name?
    AB

    ReplyDelete
  2. @ AB: Breadfruit is called as Neer Phanas in Marathi..it is a cousin of the jackfruit and is mostly seasonal. Where do you live?

    ReplyDelete
  3. I live in NJ, USA. I don't think we get Neer Phanas here. What can I substitute for it?

    ReplyDelete
  4. @Alaknanda: You could make this curry using potatoes - simple and easy :)

    ReplyDelete

I'd love to hear what you have to say about this post!

If you are unable to post a comment, please write to me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com

Last but not the least, my name is Shireen & not Ruchik :-)

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Sungta Ani Deeviso Guzo - Mangalorean Style Prawn and Breadfruit Curry


In the past few weeks the blog has seen a surge in the number of prawn recipes, isn't it? I realised this when I was busy editing the pictures of this recipe which I had tried out a few months ago and forgotten to post. Thanks to the fact that I am now able to eat prawns without a hitch (thank God for that!) we bring prawns more often and the kids are enjoying them too. I have been trying out various recipes and it's like I am making up for all the years that I couldn't enjoy them. 

Combo curries are very popular in Mangalore, especially those that include fresh or dried prawns. Most of our curries are a way of getting some sort of protein and a vegetable together in a curry to be served with plain rice. Although in comparison to what today's generation is used to eating, these dishes are laborious, the taste is unmatched and truly an experience to be indulged in at least occasionally.



I found this recipe while flipping through J.B Lobo's 'Sambardo' and adapted it minimally. If you don't get fresh prawns you can make this dish with dried ones too. Just make sure you wash them properly to get rid of the fishy smell (unless you prefer them that way)

Do write in at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com and let me know if you've tried and liked this recipe!




Sungta Ani Deeviso Guzo - Mangalorean Style Prawn and Breadfruit Curry

Ingredients:
  • 350-400 grams prawns, shelled and deveined
  • 300-350 grams (approx 1/2 of a medium sized) breadfruit, peeled and pith removed * see notes for substitute
For the masala:
  • 5-6 long dry red chillies (de seed to tone down the spice) (adjust to taste)
  • 1 medium sized onion, roughly chopped
  • 1 tablespoon coriander seeds 
  • 1/2 teaspoon fenugreek (methi) seeds
  • 3 fat cloves of garlic
  • 1/4 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 marble sized ball of tamarind
  • 1 cup grated coconut
  • Oil
For the tempering:
  • 1 tablespoon oil (preferably coconut)
  • 1/2 teaspoon mustard
  • 6-7 curry leaves
Method:
1. Rinse the prawns in salt water, refresh and drain
2. Heat a tablespoon of oil in a small frying pan and except the tamarind and turmeric powder fry all the ingredients mentioned under 'For the masala' one by one. Remove onto a plate and allow to cool then grind to a fine paste using a little water. Remove the masala and rinse the grinder jar with 1/2 cup of water and reserve it.
3. Cut the breadfruit into medium sized chunks and place in a pan. Add enough water (approx a cup) and salt to taste and cook till half cooked. Keep an eye out so that it doesn't overcook and turn mushy. 
4. Add the prawns, the ground masala paste, the reserved masala water and salt to taste. Add a little extra water to adjust the consistency of the gravy. Bring the curry to a boil and then simmer until the prawns are cooked. The breadfruit would also be cooked by then. Turn off the heat.
5. To prepare the seasoning, heat oil in a small pan and toss in the mustard. When it stops spluttering add the curry leaves and let them sizzle for a couple of seconds before pouring the mixture into the curry. Cover the pan immediately 
6. Serve hot with rice.

Notes:
Breadfruit is also called as Jeegujje in Tulu/Kannada and Neer Phanas in Marathi and some dialects of Konkani along the West coast of India (Maharashtra/Goa). If you live outside India try looking for it at your nearest Asian store. Most Sri Lankan stores may have it. If the fresh one is unavailable you may use the tinned fruit or even substitute it with tinned raw jackfruit or potatoes

4 comments:

  1. Hi Shireen,
    Would love to try this recipe. But what is 'breadfruit'? Do you know its Marathi name?
    AB

    ReplyDelete
  2. @ AB: Breadfruit is called as Neer Phanas in Marathi..it is a cousin of the jackfruit and is mostly seasonal. Where do you live?

    ReplyDelete
  3. I live in NJ, USA. I don't think we get Neer Phanas here. What can I substitute for it?

    ReplyDelete
  4. @Alaknanda: You could make this curry using potatoes - simple and easy :)

    ReplyDelete

I'd love to hear what you have to say about this post!

If you are unable to post a comment, please write to me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com

Last but not the least, my name is Shireen & not Ruchik :-)