Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Mangalorean Plated Meal Series - Boshi# 33 - Sardine Fry, Rice Papads, Sprouted Moong Curry, Tendli Carrot Pickle & Rice

BOSHI# 33


The Boshi series is back! I just realised that the last one was posted in October 2015! Boy, time does fly! It's been more than 4 months now and I thought it was about time that I revived the series only because I have been receiving many positive responses about it has helped plan menus for people especially working women. I decided that bringing the boshi series back would also help me plan my menus and motivate me to get back to 3-4 course meals at least once a week. On most days it's just simple food (usually Mangalorean) that I can put together in a maximum of 1 to 1-1/2 hours. So let's go straight today's boshi. Again, all my favourites here - fried sardines, sprouted moong curry, rice papads (happala), tendli-carrot pickle and rice!

Do check the complete Boshi series here

Thursday, February 18, 2016

Dhadiyarechi Kadi ~ Mangalorean Style Curry for Croaker/Jew Fish


Mangalorean Catholic cuisine boasts of different ways to prepare fish curries. We have a curry base for almost all kinds of fish (the fish that our ancestors have deemed fit to be consumed). The newer generation of people who have travelled across the seven seas have ofcourse not limited themselves to the few varieties of fish that they've enjoyed back home but also experimented with a lot more that coastlines of different countries have to offer. Personally I am not the type who is very adventurous when it comes to trying out new foods but I think I have given all kind of fish a try at least once. While it was bombil (bombay duck) and catla (tank fish) during my stay in Mumbai, there is a new variety of fish that I keep trying here in Dubai. I simply love the Sultan Ibrahim (madmal) here but it is pretty expensive. 

No matter which fish I try, the croaker remains to be my most favourite. It tastes great when fried, when marinated thickly with a spicy base and some curry leaves thrown in for good measure. The curry is great too, when served along with piping hot boiled rice and some fried fish and a sauteed vegetable on the side! Mouthwatering, yeah? :-)

Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Badanekai Yennegai ~ North Karnataka Style Eggplant in Peanut Curry


Last month's theme for breadbakers (the bread baking group that I am part of) had given us the theme of ancient grains and I picked JoLada rotti or sorghum flatbread which is typically prepared by folks in Northern parts of Karnataka (read my previous post here). To go with these rottis I looked for the recipe of the badanekai yennegai, a very traditional recipe that uses a particular spice blend that gives it a very earthy taste. My mum's cleaning lady (who had first told me about it) had told me that the dish required the spice and I guess she bought her stock from Bijapur, the place where she came from.

Since the spice blend required one particular spice, I had put off making this dish for a long time. Then last month I came across a simple recipe here which I adapted to make a delicious dish that I really enjoyed having with the rottis! If you manage to get the spice blend from North Karnataka, then go ahead and use it but if not, the recipe below will give you good results. 

Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Baby Corn Pepper Fry


Last July when I had been to Mangalore, my co-sister had prepared this lovely dish when she invited us over for dinner. Something as simple as baby corn became a massive hit with everyone that evening. I loved it so much that I asked her for the recipe and tried it out over the weekend. It was a hit again with my son coming back for second, third and fourth helpings! :-)

It was my first time cooking baby corn in an Indian avatar and I realised that it can be made in a zillion different ways. I will be adding it to my ever growing list of veggies to make!

Monday, February 15, 2016

Sungta Atati ~ Prawns in Bafat Masala


One of the recipes that has been in my collection for a really long time is this simple and easy prawn recipe that you can make in no time. Since it is not your fancy prawn dish, it could prove to be a strong contender to your other weekday dishes. My mum in law taught me to make this and all you need to do is chop a few ingredients - the masala requires no grinding as all you need is some bafat powder and you can put this dish together in a jiffy.

Thought this would be the perfect dish for those who are on a seafood/fish diet this Lent. Those who don't have bafat powder can buy some from the nearest 'Mangalore Stores' outlet (present in most cities in India) or better still, make a small batch just for this recipe. Do check the notes section for the same. 

Kadai Chhole (Spicy Chickpeas) ~ When The Hubby Cooks!


Chhole or chickpeas are one of our favourite legumes that are cooked at least twice or thrice a month. Most times I make our typical fugath (suke) style or make hummus (Middle Eastern dip) to be eaten with pita bread - this is usually for my son's lunchbox . When I was in Mumbai I used to make Konkani style ghashi which we enjoyed having with pooris for our breakfast. Now the typical North Indian style kadai chhole is ruling the roost since the past few months!

The hubby came across this recipe by Chef Harpal Singh Sokhi (one of our favourite chefs!) on his YouTube channel and has been hooked to it ever since. The recipe is super simple and can be made in a no time and tastes spectacular with fresh, hot pooris. Do give it a try and I am sure you'll fall in love with chhole too! 

Thursday, February 11, 2016

Egg, Fish & Seafood Recipes for Lent 2016


Dear Readers,

Here's another compilation of egg, fish & seafood recipes to help you plan your meals this Lent. If you are going pure veg this Lent, do check my compilation of Veg recipes for Lent 2016

Veg Recipes for Lent 2016



Dear Readers,

Lent is a solemn religious observance for Christians, a period that lasts approximately 6 weeks between Ash Wednesday and Easter Sunday. During this period one is urged to give up vices or temptations of any kind. 

Most Christians go on a pure vegetarian (diet that includes no meat, fish or eggs) or a semi vegetarian (diet that includes fish, seafood & eggs).

For the first time ever I have tried to compile a list of almost all vegetarian recipes on my blog that cover a wide range of categories like breakfast, snacks, soups, salads, starters, mains & sides that will help you plan your menu this Lent. 

This compilation pretty much sums up the veg recipes on my blog excluding sweets, desserts and festive foods as Lent is a time of penance and self denial. If I find that I have missed some categories, I will update it soon. If you don't find a particular recipe in the below list that you may have seen before kindly email me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com and I will include it here.

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Undi (Oondi) ~ Konkani Style Seasoned Rice Dumplings


A lot of my posts have been languishing in my drafts for over 2 weeks now and I thought I should post them now without further ado. Since we officially begin Lent with Ash Wednesday, which is today, I am hopeful that I can post more vegetarian posts than I did last year - mainly because a lot of Christians I know go veg during Lent and request me for simple yet nutritious vegetarian recipes to help sustain them during the days of fasting and prayer. I don't plan to go completely veg this Lenten season but the vice I plan to give up this Lent the amount of time spent online (which is my biggest weakness). So my posts will also be without too many stories, so kindly bear with me. I will just be online to post recipes and nothing else, hopefully (God give me strength!)

I wish you all a blessed, meaningful and holy month of Lent!

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Staffordshire Oatcakes with a Bacon & Cheese Filling ~ #Breadbakers



Baking bread has been one of my most favourite activities in the past few months. I am especially thankful to my lovely blogger friend Anshie Dhar who blogs at Spice Roots for introducing me to Bread Bakers, a group of bloggers who share with me their passion of baking breads. One of us picks a theme every month and the rest of us go and create a new bread around this theme. On this journey of bread baking I have come across so many lovely breads with so many beautiful stories revolving around them that I make it a point never to miss this baking challenge. Incidentally the person who introduced me to this group is also the host of today's theme. Anshie chose 'Griddle Breads' as the theme for February and boy, was I glad! I love griddle breads as they are so much a part of my culinary heritage. Coming from South India I have grown up eating dosas (pancakes), chapathis and rice rottis (flatbreads) that I was instantly happy that I could slip back into my comfort zone and post something that could be easily prepared by my readers and they didn't need to be intimidated by something fancy. 

I had bookmarked this recipe from the book 'Step by Step Baking' by Caroline Bretherton a few months ago and when the theme was announced I knew what I was going to make. The idea of making a multigrain griddle bread that could be whipped up in a jiffy was very appealing. Since oats in a porridge form has no takers in my house I decided that pancakes were a great way of getting my kids to have some. 

Monday, February 1, 2016

Orange Marmalade


Oranges have been ruling my fruit basket for over 2 months now. The whole of December saw us trying out the different varieties that have been flooding the supermarkets and I couldn't resist trying out different recipes with them. I have made several cakes and the marmalade has been made twice and gifted to people. There is so much joy in sharing homemade goodies, especially jams and pickles. Honestly, I am not much of a fan of oranges like my hubby and daughter are. I am not a fruit lover when it comes to eating them in their natural form but I love making things out of them. Over the past few years I had only made mocktails or used their juice or zest to flavour cakes. This time I took my craze for this citrus fruit to another level by cooking the whole fruit with sugar to result in the most delicious, preservative free jam or marmalade ever! It really helped that the supermarket I frequent had a sale on Spanish navel oranges one day. A 3 kilo bag was being sold for AED 11 (approx Rs 200). A single bottle of jam/marmalade usually costs more than that. 

Well, if you think that I got it right on my first attempt you are wrong. It is very very important to know the setting point for jams. If you cross that point you get a very thick and hard jam that will refuse to leave the bottle let alone spread out on your bread. A candy thermometer is a blessing if you have one but I decided not to use mine and keep an eye on the mixture instead and make sure that my jam didn't flop the first time around. I was so wrong. I made too many mistakes and the first batch was hard as a rock! Well, not quite. It was still edible but such a big disappointment.

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Mangalorean Plated Meal Series - Boshi# 33 - Sardine Fry, Rice Papads, Sprouted Moong Curry, Tendli Carrot Pickle & Rice

BOSHI# 33


The Boshi series is back! I just realised that the last one was posted in October 2015! Boy, time does fly! It's been more than 4 months now and I thought it was about time that I revived the series only because I have been receiving many positive responses about it has helped plan menus for people especially working women. I decided that bringing the boshi series back would also help me plan my menus and motivate me to get back to 3-4 course meals at least once a week. On most days it's just simple food (usually Mangalorean) that I can put together in a maximum of 1 to 1-1/2 hours. So let's go straight today's boshi. Again, all my favourites here - fried sardines, sprouted moong curry, rice papads (happala), tendli-carrot pickle and rice!

Do check the complete Boshi series here

Thursday, February 18, 2016

Dhadiyarechi Kadi ~ Mangalorean Style Curry for Croaker/Jew Fish


Mangalorean Catholic cuisine boasts of different ways to prepare fish curries. We have a curry base for almost all kinds of fish (the fish that our ancestors have deemed fit to be consumed). The newer generation of people who have travelled across the seven seas have ofcourse not limited themselves to the few varieties of fish that they've enjoyed back home but also experimented with a lot more that coastlines of different countries have to offer. Personally I am not the type who is very adventurous when it comes to trying out new foods but I think I have given all kind of fish a try at least once. While it was bombil (bombay duck) and catla (tank fish) during my stay in Mumbai, there is a new variety of fish that I keep trying here in Dubai. I simply love the Sultan Ibrahim (madmal) here but it is pretty expensive. 

No matter which fish I try, the croaker remains to be my most favourite. It tastes great when fried, when marinated thickly with a spicy base and some curry leaves thrown in for good measure. The curry is great too, when served along with piping hot boiled rice and some fried fish and a sauteed vegetable on the side! Mouthwatering, yeah? :-)

Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Badanekai Yennegai ~ North Karnataka Style Eggplant in Peanut Curry


Last month's theme for breadbakers (the bread baking group that I am part of) had given us the theme of ancient grains and I picked JoLada rotti or sorghum flatbread which is typically prepared by folks in Northern parts of Karnataka (read my previous post here). To go with these rottis I looked for the recipe of the badanekai yennegai, a very traditional recipe that uses a particular spice blend that gives it a very earthy taste. My mum's cleaning lady (who had first told me about it) had told me that the dish required the spice and I guess she bought her stock from Bijapur, the place where she came from.

Since the spice blend required one particular spice, I had put off making this dish for a long time. Then last month I came across a simple recipe here which I adapted to make a delicious dish that I really enjoyed having with the rottis! If you manage to get the spice blend from North Karnataka, then go ahead and use it but if not, the recipe below will give you good results. 

Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Baby Corn Pepper Fry


Last July when I had been to Mangalore, my co-sister had prepared this lovely dish when she invited us over for dinner. Something as simple as baby corn became a massive hit with everyone that evening. I loved it so much that I asked her for the recipe and tried it out over the weekend. It was a hit again with my son coming back for second, third and fourth helpings! :-)

It was my first time cooking baby corn in an Indian avatar and I realised that it can be made in a zillion different ways. I will be adding it to my ever growing list of veggies to make!

Monday, February 15, 2016

Sungta Atati ~ Prawns in Bafat Masala


One of the recipes that has been in my collection for a really long time is this simple and easy prawn recipe that you can make in no time. Since it is not your fancy prawn dish, it could prove to be a strong contender to your other weekday dishes. My mum in law taught me to make this and all you need to do is chop a few ingredients - the masala requires no grinding as all you need is some bafat powder and you can put this dish together in a jiffy.

Thought this would be the perfect dish for those who are on a seafood/fish diet this Lent. Those who don't have bafat powder can buy some from the nearest 'Mangalore Stores' outlet (present in most cities in India) or better still, make a small batch just for this recipe. Do check the notes section for the same. 

Kadai Chhole (Spicy Chickpeas) ~ When The Hubby Cooks!


Chhole or chickpeas are one of our favourite legumes that are cooked at least twice or thrice a month. Most times I make our typical fugath (suke) style or make hummus (Middle Eastern dip) to be eaten with pita bread - this is usually for my son's lunchbox . When I was in Mumbai I used to make Konkani style ghashi which we enjoyed having with pooris for our breakfast. Now the typical North Indian style kadai chhole is ruling the roost since the past few months!

The hubby came across this recipe by Chef Harpal Singh Sokhi (one of our favourite chefs!) on his YouTube channel and has been hooked to it ever since. The recipe is super simple and can be made in a no time and tastes spectacular with fresh, hot pooris. Do give it a try and I am sure you'll fall in love with chhole too! 

Thursday, February 11, 2016

Egg, Fish & Seafood Recipes for Lent 2016


Dear Readers,

Here's another compilation of egg, fish & seafood recipes to help you plan your meals this Lent. If you are going pure veg this Lent, do check my compilation of Veg recipes for Lent 2016

Veg Recipes for Lent 2016



Dear Readers,

Lent is a solemn religious observance for Christians, a period that lasts approximately 6 weeks between Ash Wednesday and Easter Sunday. During this period one is urged to give up vices or temptations of any kind. 

Most Christians go on a pure vegetarian (diet that includes no meat, fish or eggs) or a semi vegetarian (diet that includes fish, seafood & eggs).

For the first time ever I have tried to compile a list of almost all vegetarian recipes on my blog that cover a wide range of categories like breakfast, snacks, soups, salads, starters, mains & sides that will help you plan your menu this Lent. 

This compilation pretty much sums up the veg recipes on my blog excluding sweets, desserts and festive foods as Lent is a time of penance and self denial. If I find that I have missed some categories, I will update it soon. If you don't find a particular recipe in the below list that you may have seen before kindly email me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com and I will include it here.

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Undi (Oondi) ~ Konkani Style Seasoned Rice Dumplings


A lot of my posts have been languishing in my drafts for over 2 weeks now and I thought I should post them now without further ado. Since we officially begin Lent with Ash Wednesday, which is today, I am hopeful that I can post more vegetarian posts than I did last year - mainly because a lot of Christians I know go veg during Lent and request me for simple yet nutritious vegetarian recipes to help sustain them during the days of fasting and prayer. I don't plan to go completely veg this Lenten season but the vice I plan to give up this Lent the amount of time spent online (which is my biggest weakness). So my posts will also be without too many stories, so kindly bear with me. I will just be online to post recipes and nothing else, hopefully (God give me strength!)

I wish you all a blessed, meaningful and holy month of Lent!

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Staffordshire Oatcakes with a Bacon & Cheese Filling ~ #Breadbakers



Baking bread has been one of my most favourite activities in the past few months. I am especially thankful to my lovely blogger friend Anshie Dhar who blogs at Spice Roots for introducing me to Bread Bakers, a group of bloggers who share with me their passion of baking breads. One of us picks a theme every month and the rest of us go and create a new bread around this theme. On this journey of bread baking I have come across so many lovely breads with so many beautiful stories revolving around them that I make it a point never to miss this baking challenge. Incidentally the person who introduced me to this group is also the host of today's theme. Anshie chose 'Griddle Breads' as the theme for February and boy, was I glad! I love griddle breads as they are so much a part of my culinary heritage. Coming from South India I have grown up eating dosas (pancakes), chapathis and rice rottis (flatbreads) that I was instantly happy that I could slip back into my comfort zone and post something that could be easily prepared by my readers and they didn't need to be intimidated by something fancy. 

I had bookmarked this recipe from the book 'Step by Step Baking' by Caroline Bretherton a few months ago and when the theme was announced I knew what I was going to make. The idea of making a multigrain griddle bread that could be whipped up in a jiffy was very appealing. Since oats in a porridge form has no takers in my house I decided that pancakes were a great way of getting my kids to have some. 

Monday, February 1, 2016

Orange Marmalade


Oranges have been ruling my fruit basket for over 2 months now. The whole of December saw us trying out the different varieties that have been flooding the supermarkets and I couldn't resist trying out different recipes with them. I have made several cakes and the marmalade has been made twice and gifted to people. There is so much joy in sharing homemade goodies, especially jams and pickles. Honestly, I am not much of a fan of oranges like my hubby and daughter are. I am not a fruit lover when it comes to eating them in their natural form but I love making things out of them. Over the past few years I had only made mocktails or used their juice or zest to flavour cakes. This time I took my craze for this citrus fruit to another level by cooking the whole fruit with sugar to result in the most delicious, preservative free jam or marmalade ever! It really helped that the supermarket I frequent had a sale on Spanish navel oranges one day. A 3 kilo bag was being sold for AED 11 (approx Rs 200). A single bottle of jam/marmalade usually costs more than that. 

Well, if you think that I got it right on my first attempt you are wrong. It is very very important to know the setting point for jams. If you cross that point you get a very thick and hard jam that will refuse to leave the bottle let alone spread out on your bread. A candy thermometer is a blessing if you have one but I decided not to use mine and keep an eye on the mixture instead and make sure that my jam didn't flop the first time around. I was so wrong. I made too many mistakes and the first batch was hard as a rock! Well, not quite. It was still edible but such a big disappointment.