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Monday, August 6, 2012

Polay / Polo/ Dosai (Yeasted Rice Batter Pancakes)

Our humble South Indian dosa has gone global, thanks to the well marketed masala dosa that has now become the world's favourite any time snack. The dosa adapts itself very well to whatever you wish to serve it with - chutney, sambhar or a masala filling that can range between a simple spiced mashed potato to a chicken schezwan. However the ever popular masala dosa has in many ways overshadowed the other varieties of dosas - neer dosa, set dosa & the Catholic style yeasted dosa. And these are just dosas that are made of rice batter. The variety owes itself to the difference in the proportion of the ingredients used.

The yeasted dosa or polo as we call it is prepared with the sanna batter - the only difference between the two is that sanna are steamed and polay (plural of polo) are pan fried. You need to take care that the polay are fried as soon as the dough has risen. If you let an hour or two pass by, the fermented dough may 'fall' leading to flat polay. Also, since the polay batter makes use of yeast as a fermenting agent, the dough can turn sour if left outside for too long.


I learnt to make them just recently as Roshan simply loves them and they taste awesome with any non vegetarian curry. A few months ago I attempted them for the first time and was pretty pleased with the results. We had them with Pork Bafat and yesterday I made them again to be teamed up with Pork Indad (recipe to follow). I call them the 'pughre polay' (fluffy dosai) because the term 'polay' is generic and can mean any kind (made of various ingredients). 

I wish I was able to click more pictures of these lovely, fluffy and fragrant polay - alas! they disappeared before I could get my camera ready. Maybe I'll update this post with some more pictures the next time I make them. 


Polay (Yeasted Rice Batter Pancakes)
Soaking time: 3hrs or overnight | Prep time: 15mins | Cooking time: 15-20mins Yield: 17-18 medium sized pancakes

You Need:
  • 1-1/2 cups boiled rice (ukda chawal)
  • 1/2 cup raw rice * see notes
  • 1/4 cup urad dal (split black gram)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2-3 tsp (or to taste) sugar
To prepare the yeast solution
  • 1 tsp dried yeast 
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 3 tbsp warm water
Other ingredients
  • oil for frying
Method:
1. Wash & soak the boiled rice, raw rice and urad dal in plenty of water in separate bowls for at least 3 hours (or overnight). Grind the urad dal to a fine paste first and remove. Next, grind the two types of rice with very little water to yield a thick dryish batter of dosa batter consistency. Mix this batter along with the urad dal paste, salt to taste and sugar. Transfer the mixture to a pan that is large enough to contain dough that doubles.
2. In a small bowl mix the warm water with the yeast and sugar and allow to rest for 10 mins till the mixture turns frothy - this is active yeast which must then be mixed to the batter well. Check salt and sugar proportion and add more if required.
3. Cover the pan with a thin muslin cloth and keep in a warm place undisturbed. The dough will take anywhere between 1-1/2 - 2 hours to double (in a favourable warm weather). Gently stir the dough once but not too much or you will kill the fermentation.
4. Heat a flat cast iron tawa/skillet or a flat non stick pan. Grease it evenly with oil and pour approximately 2 ladles of dough in the centre. Using the base of the ladle carefully spread the dough in a circular fashion to form a dosa. Cover and allow to cook on a medium flame for a minute - or until the surface of the dosa looks fluffy and cooked and the base is golden brown.
5. Remove carefully with a flat steel spatula and serve hot with any non vegetarian or vegetarian curry of your choice or with chutney or sambhar.

Note:
1. If you don't intend to use up all the dough to make polay, you can simply pour it into ramekins (gindlaa) and steam them to make a batch of sanna. If you don't have ramekins, just pour out the dough into a lightly greased steel plate with tall edges (thaali/boshi) and steam it in one go. You can cut up this large sanna and serve it.
2. Alternately, if you do not wish to steam up the remaining batter into sanna but wish to eat some polay for dinner/refrigerate them for the next day then I suggest you fry up the entire batch and just steam them in a steaming pot/thondor for 5-7 minutes before serving them - they become absolutely fresh and soft.
3. Take a look at my sanna recipe for more tips on how to prepare the perfect batter

21 comments:

  1. Delicious and lovely looking dosa.
    Deepa

    ReplyDelete
  2. ohh really cant imagine my life without dosa and this is such a new one. such a spongy texture.

    ReplyDelete
  3. My mom makes a similar kind. They look nice & porous. Love these for breakfast with coriander & coconut chutney

    Do drop by my space & follow if you like

    http://shwetainthekitchen.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  4. Such a super fluffy dosas, inviting.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Soft and spongy!! Living in mlore, i have never tastes polay..tasted and love sannas though since its easily available at supermarkets..We usually make egg curries to go with it..looking fwd to the indad recipe...also would love to know how to make egg indad :))
    Prathima Rao
    Prats Corner

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thanks everyone for your comments!! Prathima, thanks a lot :) you must try making Sanna & Polay at home itself, fresh and nice. All you need is dried yeast which is easily available in Mlore. I will post the Indad recipe by evening, you can definitely try it with eggs!! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Shireen kindly tell me one cup means how many grams of rice. Because yeast you said 1 tsp. so it is better if you could tell me the qty of rice too.

      Hima

      Delete
    2. Dear Shireen kindly tell me the qty in grms or kgs. because while adding 1 tsp of yeast the proportion of rice should be correct or else it will go wrong. so let me know 1 1/2 cup means how many grms.

      Delete
    3. Hi Hema,

      Unfortunately, I am not at home right now - on vacation and I cannot measure/weight the rice right now. I have used a US standard cup measure where 1 cup = 240ml. So if you use the cup and teaspoon measures you won't go wrong.

      Delete
  7. Yay! This is a cool recipe! Looks like regular dosa but I'm intrigued by the yeast!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Looks grt, btw could you please tell what the woody woven base in the first two snaps are called? its most used so the steam from the freshly cooked dosa's or idlis can escape without turning the dosa soggy! I cant seem to remember what its called!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thanks Sree! The woven base is made of reed..and called as 'Kurpon' in Konkani..not sure what its called in other languages :)

    ReplyDelete
  10. Can you please share appam recipe ? I was looking for it in your recipe index. There are so many versions of appam recipe-- I am a Mangalorean and want a soft tasty appam recipe please
    Minny Rai
    minnyrai@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  11. @ Minny: Here you go : http://www.ruchikrandhap.com/2011/02/appams-sweet-fermented-rice-pancakes.html

    Hope you enjoy them :)

    ReplyDelete
  12. hi,
    Shireen, pl help me here!
    Since it requires only 2hrs for fermenation, I need to grind in the morning,
    therefore I dont want to disturb the late wakers _ my question is ..
    can I grind in the evening and add only 1/2 tsp yeast and keep it overnight
    for fermentation? pl reply urgently - thanyou
    and make the polays the nex morning -

    ReplyDelete
  13. @ Maria: You can prepare the batter (grinding, fermention etc) the previous morning. Then refrigerate it for the whole day. At night, remove it from the fridge and keep it out on the counter, it will be ready by the time everyone wakes up (I do this often!)

    ReplyDelete
  14. Shireen, more questions...
    if it requires less time to ferment in the day with 1 tsp yeast
    wont the fermented batter left overnight on the counter
    be a little too overdue with 1tsp yeast?
    Sorry, i dont want it to go wrong! I am comfortable with 1/2tsp yeast
    actually, so the confusion. Pl enlighten! thanks

    ReplyDelete
  15. @ Maria, if you want it for Monday morning's breakfast, you grind and ferment it by say 11am on Sunday and then you refrigerate it for the whole day in a steel pan. At night, around 9.30-10pm you leave it out on the counter. The batter will take a while to come to room temperature as it would be chilled. Then it will rise, by then your batter will be ready to be cooked into polay. If you want you can use 1/2 tsp yeast. I haven't tried it but I guess you could!

    ReplyDelete
  16. thanks shireen for your quick reply ... i think i better follow your method -
    my initial courage seems to have dwindled!!!! will let you know.bye

    ReplyDelete

I'd love to hear what you have to say about this post!

If you are unable to post a comment, please write to me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com

Last but not the least, my name is Shireen & not Ruchik :-)

Monday, August 6, 2012

Polay / Polo/ Dosai (Yeasted Rice Batter Pancakes)

Our humble South Indian dosa has gone global, thanks to the well marketed masala dosa that has now become the world's favourite any time snack. The dosa adapts itself very well to whatever you wish to serve it with - chutney, sambhar or a masala filling that can range between a simple spiced mashed potato to a chicken schezwan. However the ever popular masala dosa has in many ways overshadowed the other varieties of dosas - neer dosa, set dosa & the Catholic style yeasted dosa. And these are just dosas that are made of rice batter. The variety owes itself to the difference in the proportion of the ingredients used.

The yeasted dosa or polo as we call it is prepared with the sanna batter - the only difference between the two is that sanna are steamed and polay (plural of polo) are pan fried. You need to take care that the polay are fried as soon as the dough has risen. If you let an hour or two pass by, the fermented dough may 'fall' leading to flat polay. Also, since the polay batter makes use of yeast as a fermenting agent, the dough can turn sour if left outside for too long.


I learnt to make them just recently as Roshan simply loves them and they taste awesome with any non vegetarian curry. A few months ago I attempted them for the first time and was pretty pleased with the results. We had them with Pork Bafat and yesterday I made them again to be teamed up with Pork Indad (recipe to follow). I call them the 'pughre polay' (fluffy dosai) because the term 'polay' is generic and can mean any kind (made of various ingredients). 

I wish I was able to click more pictures of these lovely, fluffy and fragrant polay - alas! they disappeared before I could get my camera ready. Maybe I'll update this post with some more pictures the next time I make them. 


Polay (Yeasted Rice Batter Pancakes)
Soaking time: 3hrs or overnight | Prep time: 15mins | Cooking time: 15-20mins Yield: 17-18 medium sized pancakes

You Need:
  • 1-1/2 cups boiled rice (ukda chawal)
  • 1/2 cup raw rice * see notes
  • 1/4 cup urad dal (split black gram)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2-3 tsp (or to taste) sugar
To prepare the yeast solution
  • 1 tsp dried yeast 
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 3 tbsp warm water
Other ingredients
  • oil for frying
Method:
1. Wash & soak the boiled rice, raw rice and urad dal in plenty of water in separate bowls for at least 3 hours (or overnight). Grind the urad dal to a fine paste first and remove. Next, grind the two types of rice with very little water to yield a thick dryish batter of dosa batter consistency. Mix this batter along with the urad dal paste, salt to taste and sugar. Transfer the mixture to a pan that is large enough to contain dough that doubles.
2. In a small bowl mix the warm water with the yeast and sugar and allow to rest for 10 mins till the mixture turns frothy - this is active yeast which must then be mixed to the batter well. Check salt and sugar proportion and add more if required.
3. Cover the pan with a thin muslin cloth and keep in a warm place undisturbed. The dough will take anywhere between 1-1/2 - 2 hours to double (in a favourable warm weather). Gently stir the dough once but not too much or you will kill the fermentation.
4. Heat a flat cast iron tawa/skillet or a flat non stick pan. Grease it evenly with oil and pour approximately 2 ladles of dough in the centre. Using the base of the ladle carefully spread the dough in a circular fashion to form a dosa. Cover and allow to cook on a medium flame for a minute - or until the surface of the dosa looks fluffy and cooked and the base is golden brown.
5. Remove carefully with a flat steel spatula and serve hot with any non vegetarian or vegetarian curry of your choice or with chutney or sambhar.

Note:
1. If you don't intend to use up all the dough to make polay, you can simply pour it into ramekins (gindlaa) and steam them to make a batch of sanna. If you don't have ramekins, just pour out the dough into a lightly greased steel plate with tall edges (thaali/boshi) and steam it in one go. You can cut up this large sanna and serve it.
2. Alternately, if you do not wish to steam up the remaining batter into sanna but wish to eat some polay for dinner/refrigerate them for the next day then I suggest you fry up the entire batch and just steam them in a steaming pot/thondor for 5-7 minutes before serving them - they become absolutely fresh and soft.
3. Take a look at my sanna recipe for more tips on how to prepare the perfect batter

21 comments:

  1. Delicious and lovely looking dosa.
    Deepa

    ReplyDelete
  2. ohh really cant imagine my life without dosa and this is such a new one. such a spongy texture.

    ReplyDelete
  3. My mom makes a similar kind. They look nice & porous. Love these for breakfast with coriander & coconut chutney

    Do drop by my space & follow if you like

    http://shwetainthekitchen.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  4. Such a super fluffy dosas, inviting.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Soft and spongy!! Living in mlore, i have never tastes polay..tasted and love sannas though since its easily available at supermarkets..We usually make egg curries to go with it..looking fwd to the indad recipe...also would love to know how to make egg indad :))
    Prathima Rao
    Prats Corner

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thanks everyone for your comments!! Prathima, thanks a lot :) you must try making Sanna & Polay at home itself, fresh and nice. All you need is dried yeast which is easily available in Mlore. I will post the Indad recipe by evening, you can definitely try it with eggs!! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Shireen kindly tell me one cup means how many grams of rice. Because yeast you said 1 tsp. so it is better if you could tell me the qty of rice too.

      Hima

      Delete
    2. Dear Shireen kindly tell me the qty in grms or kgs. because while adding 1 tsp of yeast the proportion of rice should be correct or else it will go wrong. so let me know 1 1/2 cup means how many grms.

      Delete
    3. Hi Hema,

      Unfortunately, I am not at home right now - on vacation and I cannot measure/weight the rice right now. I have used a US standard cup measure where 1 cup = 240ml. So if you use the cup and teaspoon measures you won't go wrong.

      Delete
  7. Yay! This is a cool recipe! Looks like regular dosa but I'm intrigued by the yeast!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Looks grt, btw could you please tell what the woody woven base in the first two snaps are called? its most used so the steam from the freshly cooked dosa's or idlis can escape without turning the dosa soggy! I cant seem to remember what its called!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thanks Sree! The woven base is made of reed..and called as 'Kurpon' in Konkani..not sure what its called in other languages :)

    ReplyDelete
  10. Can you please share appam recipe ? I was looking for it in your recipe index. There are so many versions of appam recipe-- I am a Mangalorean and want a soft tasty appam recipe please
    Minny Rai
    minnyrai@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  11. @ Minny: Here you go : http://www.ruchikrandhap.com/2011/02/appams-sweet-fermented-rice-pancakes.html

    Hope you enjoy them :)

    ReplyDelete
  12. hi,
    Shireen, pl help me here!
    Since it requires only 2hrs for fermenation, I need to grind in the morning,
    therefore I dont want to disturb the late wakers _ my question is ..
    can I grind in the evening and add only 1/2 tsp yeast and keep it overnight
    for fermentation? pl reply urgently - thanyou
    and make the polays the nex morning -

    ReplyDelete
  13. @ Maria: You can prepare the batter (grinding, fermention etc) the previous morning. Then refrigerate it for the whole day. At night, remove it from the fridge and keep it out on the counter, it will be ready by the time everyone wakes up (I do this often!)

    ReplyDelete
  14. Shireen, more questions...
    if it requires less time to ferment in the day with 1 tsp yeast
    wont the fermented batter left overnight on the counter
    be a little too overdue with 1tsp yeast?
    Sorry, i dont want it to go wrong! I am comfortable with 1/2tsp yeast
    actually, so the confusion. Pl enlighten! thanks

    ReplyDelete
  15. @ Maria, if you want it for Monday morning's breakfast, you grind and ferment it by say 11am on Sunday and then you refrigerate it for the whole day in a steel pan. At night, around 9.30-10pm you leave it out on the counter. The batter will take a while to come to room temperature as it would be chilled. Then it will rise, by then your batter will be ready to be cooked into polay. If you want you can use 1/2 tsp yeast. I haven't tried it but I guess you could!

    ReplyDelete
  16. thanks shireen for your quick reply ... i think i better follow your method -
    my initial courage seems to have dwindled!!!! will let you know.bye

    ReplyDelete

I'd love to hear what you have to say about this post!

If you are unable to post a comment, please write to me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com

Last but not the least, my name is Shireen & not Ruchik :-)