Saturday, June 11, 2011

Sanna (Mangalorean Idlis/Steamed Rice Cakes)

If you are a Mangalorean/Goan you can conjour up the best of memories when you see a plate of steaming sannas, isnt it? Picture this - a bowl of piping hot Pork Sorpotel or Pork Bafat with some steaming fresh from the tondor Sannas - Bliss! Being a Mangalorean Catholic, the deep rooted love for Sannas came naturally and even the thought of Sannas brings to my mind a sweet fragrance of fermenting rice batter that attaches itself to everything from the steam to the kitchen walls and also to those who are preparing them. 

Sannas used to be a grand affair when I was little. They were always made to mark some celebratory occasion - feasts, festivals and birthdays, when it was made in abundance to cater to a large number of guests who poured into our homes. My fondest memories are of my mum hurriedly pouring batter into ramekins, batch after batch and trying to finish off just in time to attend the midnight Mass on Christmas Eve. We would then return from Mass and have a second round of dinner - Sannas with Pork. Yum!


I think, most Mangaloreans I know would have eaten Sannas with Dukramaas (Pork Bafat) on Christmas day - year after year. This is like the Christmas Day staple diet. When I was in Mangalore, many churches/schools, especially St. Agnes Special school used to host the 'Christmas Tree' celebrations or 'Fancy Fetes' on Christmas day or the day after (usually during the Christmas week). It was impossible not to bump into a hundred relatives, friends and those you met last year on the same date during the same fete :-) And it was impossible to avoid the standard question "Christmas gammath gi? Kalein special?" (Did you have a jolly good time for Christmas? What was special for lunch?) and yeah - the most standard answer would be "Sanna ani Dukramaas". Although there would be other special items on the menu in every house, it went without saying that 'Sannas & Pork' were the highlight of the day.

While the world famous South Indian Idli is undoubtedly one of my most favourite breakfast items, the Sannas - the cousin of the Idli, is a class apart and wins hands down. While the Idli is fermented with the use of Urad Dal  (Black Gram Dal) (original method) or the instant versions use a combo of baking soda/fruit salt & yogurt to give it the 'fermented' feel and make it double in quantity instantly, the Sannas use the traditional method of fermenting the batter with the use of Toddy/Arrack (fermented coconut water which miraculously transforms itself into cheap liquor) or yeast (usually dry yeast). The texture of the Idli is slightly coarse as one needs to grind the batter to a 'rawa' like (grainy) consistency and the colour is a cloudy white owing to the comparitively larger proportion of Urad Dal used. The Sannas are fluffier and whiter and every housewife will claim that she holds the recipe to Sannas that are 'Kapsa Bori' (as fluffy as Cottonwool!)


Sugar is also added to the batter before it is poured into 'gindul (singular) /gindlaan (plural)' (ramekins) and steamed in a steamer (tondor - similar to the dhokla maker) which gives the Sannas a sweeter taste than regular Idlis. 

The Sannas also score over the Idlis as you can eat Sannas for breakfast - with Chutney and/or Sambhar,  for lunch & dinner as an accompaniment to Chicken/Pork/Mutton/Beef/Vegetable curries/gravies. During teatime one can savour them with a little Sweetened Roce (coconut milk) or by simply dipping them in Tea/Coffee. Leftover Sannas are also deep fried and eaten as a pakora (but I would never recommend it as the Sannas absorb a lot of oil!). Infants and toddlers often love the Sanna dipped in milk or ghee and sugar - crunchy & yummy. If you are bored with the regular Sanna, you can make sweet or savoury stuffed Sannas too! How versatile! 


Although Sannas were traditionally made in every Mangalorean/Goan home, it is available in bakeries today. Some housewives take regular/seasonal orders and have them home delivered. It is considered cost effective by many people including office goers and senior citizens who are in no position to dabble with the whole Sanna making process. However, Sannas taste best when they are fresh and warm - right out of the 'tondor'!

I think I should stop rambling about the Sannas and give you a chance to try them out! If you have made Idlis before, this should come easy, if not, don't worry, there's always a first time :-) - the one you wont regret!


Sanna
Yield: Approx 25-27 sannas when the batter is well fermented. For a heigher yield take a ratio of 3:1 (cups of boiled rice : raw rice)
Recipe Source: My mum

You Need:
  • 1-1/2 cups Boiled rice (also called as Parboiled rice/Ukda Chawal/Idli Rice/Ukdo/Katsambar)
  • 1/2 cup Raw rice (smalled grained rice such as Kolam in Hindi/Surai in Konkani/Belthige Akki in Kannada) - I use Satyam brand Kolam rice which is really nice
  • 1 fistful Urad dal (Split Black Gram Dal) (about 1/4 cup)
  • 1 heaped tsp yeast
  • 1 tsp sugar (to prepare the yeast solution) 
  • 3-4 tbsp tepid water (to prepare the yeast solution)
  • salt to taste (about 1 level tsp for the above mentioned quantity)
  • sugar to taste (around 2-3 tsps)
Method:
1. Wash and soak the two types of rice and Urad dal separately (in separate vessels) for at least 3 hours in plenty of water
2. First grind the Urad dal to a fine paste and remove it - this helps in making the Sannas fluffy. Next, grind both types of rice together to a fine thick batter (not as coarse as Idli batter). Try to use as little water as possible to grind. It should be of dosa batter consistency but not too thick. Transfer to a wide, deep pan large enough to accomodate batter that will double during fermentation.
3. Prepare the yeast solution by mixing the yeast and sugar in a bowl of tepid water. The sugar helps the yeast to dissolve faster. Allow to stand for 10 minutes, the yeast will ferment and turn frothy. Stir to ensure that all the yeast granules have dissolved and what you have is a thick solution.


4. Mix the yeast solution into the batter until completely incorporated. Add sugar to taste (batter can be mildly sweet like appams - but it's upto you how sweet you want them). Add salt to taste (around 1 level tsp) Mix well and cover with a thin muslin cloth and place it undisturbed in a warm place to ferment for about 2 hours (during really hot weather, the batter will ferment in just about 1-1/2 hours)
5. The batter would have doubled - for fluffy Sannas do not stir the batter or it will go flat. Place sufficient water in the steamer (tondor) and bring the water to a boil. Keep ramekins greased and ready. Pour batter into them half full. Place these ramekins into the steamer, cover the lid and steam for 15-20 minutes. Remove the lid carefully so as to prevent the vapour from falling on the Sannas (making the surface slightly soggy) and the steam from burning your hands/face. Carefully remove the ramekins and place them face down on a large plate. Allow to cool (to speed up this process if you need the ramekins for the second batch, place cold wet towels over them to speeden up the cooling process).
6. Once cool, remove carefully and serve ! enjoy!

87 comments:

  1. Lovely idlis...looks so spongy and soft...pearly white and I am sure it would be great with any spicy accompaniment.

    ReplyDelete
  2. superb soft n moist idlis..never heard abt this version..thanx for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Shir I made them too twice.. Was so happy it came out nice. Love sannas.

    Will try this version too and let u know.
    Looooved the third snap :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Quite a new idlis for me, adding yeast sounds interesting,cant wait to try this soon..love that cute moulds..

    ReplyDelete
  5. They look really nice n fluffy like little pillows! A great new version n a must try!
    US Masala

    ReplyDelete
  6. They looks really soft and wow,treat for eyes too !I am sure I will enjoy making this!

    ReplyDelete
  7. the idlis look so soft and delicious..new to me..glad to follow u..do visit my space when time permits :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Looks yummy! I will try it today :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thanks Priya :) lemme know how they turn out!

    ReplyDelete
  10. It came out really good!! Thanks for the recipe Shireen. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Wonderful Priya!! Glad u liked it :)

    ReplyDelete
  12. Sanna looks delicious.Can we substitute yeast with baking powder.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hi Lavina, thanks! Actually there is no real substitute for yeast. Toddy is a known substitute for yeast as both contain the micro organisms that are required to rise the dough. However, using baking soda with a combination of lime juice may help, but I cannot guarantee you that the results will be exactly like that of yeast. Baking soda is used where ingredients are naturally acidic, so in order to give the near perfect result as yeast you may add equal parts of baking soda (not baking powder) and lemon juice to equal the amount of yeast called for in the recipe. I have never tried it, so i cannot give you a 100% assurance that it will work. Do try the recipe with yeast itself - it is available with any grocer. Just ask for active dry yeast - in the gulf you can use DCL brand or in India you can ask for Bakers or Bluebird brands

    ReplyDelete
  14. Thanks Shireen for your wonderful explanation of using baking soda instead of yeast. Somehow i could get Fleischmann's Yeast Active Dry Yeast From Walmart(I live in USA).I will give a try . The Combination of dukramaas with sanna is so tempting.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Thanks for the Sanna recipes. one of my favourites.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Referring to the above comment - fleischmann's yeast is pretty strong as compared to our indian brand, so i guess you should use it lesser than required

    ReplyDelete
  17. Can I do it without the "1 fistful Urad dal (Split Black Gram Dal? Because I'm not sure what that is. ;)
    Also, what is the purose of using the "1 fistful Urad dal (Split Black Gram Dal)?"
    Thank You.
    I'm Christy

    ReplyDelete
  18. I have another questions. Can I use regular asian jasmine rice on this recipe? I from USA and where I live, not sure where I can find the "boiled rice' [Idli Rice].
    christy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Christy,

      Are you in the bay area? If so, you can find boiled rice at New India Bazaar on El Camino Real, Santa Clara. Stores that sell products from Kerala usually carry it too.

      Delete
  19. Hi Christy, ideally you need to use all the ingredients mentioned, but you may skip the Urad Dal which can be found in Indian stores by the name of White Black Gram Dal. But I know people who have lentil allergies who skip them while making Sannas. Urad dal is used to aid fermentation of the batter and ofcourse for the flavour & texture.

    However you will need to use a combination of boiled rice (which looks almost like arborio rice) and raw rice (you may use Basmati rice). In India, sometimes instead of the combination of these two types of rice (boiled rice + raw rice) we use a single type of rice called Parboiled rice which I am not sure will be available in Indian/Asian speciality stores, do give it a try though. Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Thanks for replying back. Maybe I'll give it a try when I find the ingredients. Again thank you!
    Christy

    ReplyDelete
  21. Hi Christy, I am sure you will find all the ingredients at any well stocked Indian store in your locality. I will update this post with the pictures of the different kinds of rice just to help you get an idea :)

    ReplyDelete
  22. Hi Shireen, made your sanna's yesterday! with red rice and sambhar turned out really well, I had used not used yeast in Idlis, this was new to me :), thanks for sharing...

    ReplyDelete
  23. Great to hear that Jayasri!! Glad u liked the Sannas :)

    ReplyDelete
  24. Hi Shireen,
    Just made sannas,and they turned out awesome!Thanks for sharing the recipe.

    ReplyDelete
  25. @Unknown: Thanks so much for the feedback!! Great to hear that they turned out well :)

    ReplyDelete
  26. Hi, i am new to your blog. I tried out your sannas recipe last week and it came out perfect, just the way it looks in your pics :)!! I have always been wanting to make sannas all my life but to no success. I just stumbled upon your website and thought let me try, since your instructions to prepare were very clear cut and looked easy. I am so happy that I finally got the right recipe for making soft and tasty sannas! Thank you!!

    ReplyDelete
  27. @Karen: Thanks so much!! It feels so good to know that the Sannas turned out fine! Do let me know if you've tried some more recipes and how you liked them!

    ReplyDelete
  28. hi shireen,
    i followed ur recipe exactly and it came out perfect. thank u so much
    jasmin

    ReplyDelete
  29. @Jasmin: Thanks so much for your feedback!! Feels great to know that you tried and liked them :)

    ReplyDelete
  30. Hi Shireen - Honestly, I am so blogged about your blog :) It truly is a piece of virtual salivating heaven, I must say! :)

    Anyways, I was wondering if these Idlies can be made in an Idly cooker? cause that's what I have. I live in Seattle, so it's really hard for me to get these utensils. Probably I should get one when I come to India. BTW, I am a Banglorean :)

    ReplyDelete
  31. @Unknown: Thank you soo much!! I am humbled by your compliments! Well, if you don't have regular sanna ramekins u can try the idly cooker, but the result won't be the same, so do try and get them on your next trip to India!

    ReplyDelete
  32. I live in Brazil and here Urad/moong dhal or for the matter-of-fact any other type of dhal is not available. Thank you for this recipe...I am surely going to try it any my kids are going to love it.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Thanks a lot Veena! Good luck with the Sannas, hope u like them :)

    ReplyDelete
  34. Thanks for the tips about the vessel, Shireen! Btw, I am Poornima.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Thanks for your comment Poornima! Hope you like the Sanna!

    ReplyDelete
  36. I tried this recipe without the urad dal, it came out really good. It was great having a reply from you SHireen, made me so much more connected to India.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Thanks so much for your feedback Veena! So good to know that the Sanna came out good even without the urad dal! It feels great to be connected to you too - the internet is truly a terrific invention!

    ReplyDelete
  38. Hi Shireen I am going to try sannas tomorrow. Just wanted to know if the grinding is possible in a mixie. I dont have a wet grinder. What is the consistency I should look for?
    Ashwini

    ReplyDelete
  39. Hi Ashwini, yes, grinding is possible in a mixie, I do the same too. Use the jar that has a blade meant for grinding rice (the one that looks like a fan), it will be the bigger jar of your mixie. You need to grind the batter fine like dosa batter, however retain the water from the mixie (when you have removed the batter & added water to wash it) and add it to the batter...it should be wee bit thinner than dosa batter but not runny.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Hi shireen
    have a doubt if want to make these sannas early in d morning then can i let the batter to ferment for whole night. First time trying my hand on this. Please help. Also would the soaking time vary. Thanks.
    Lavina sequeira

    ReplyDelete
  41. Hi Lavina,

    If the weather is not too warm (like Mlore) you may leave it to ferment overnight, as I know a lot of people who do that. Also, the quality/brand of yeast used will determine how fast your batter will ferment. Since I use DCL brand of yeast it ferments in no time and I've had a case of batter going sour when I left it overnight - which is why if I intend to make the sannas for breakfast I usually steam them the previous evening, refrigerate and then lightly steam (not microwave!) them again in the morning - they turn out super soft and fluffy!

    ReplyDelete
  42. Thanks for the reply dear. I am in mumbai i have bright star brand yeast. I think i will make it in the evening and steam it next day. Hope it turns out well. Also does the rice and lentils need to be soaked only for 3 hours or can be soaked longer too.
    Shireen i love all ur recipes. I dont know if u remember me but i have commented earlier too on raw plantain curry (star moon). I recomended ur site to my sis who is in dubai and she was very happy. She just loved the way u pen down even minute things. She made kori curry and was happy with the result. Dev bhoren karu tuka.

    ReplyDelete
  43. Thanks so much for all the lovely things you said Lavina. Thanks also for recommending my site to your sister. Glad to know that she liked the kori curry :-)

    Well, if you soak the rice+urad dal for more than 2-3 hours they say the batter turns out sour fast. I have personally not gone beyond 3 hours, so haven't experienced this. But if you leave it to ferment for too long it will definitely go sour

    ReplyDelete
  44. Hi! Thank you for sharing your sanna recipe. You have mentioned that for a heigher yield take a ratio of 3:1 (cups of boiled rice : raw rice)- I would be grateful if you could let me know if the quantity of yeast also should be increased. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  45. @ Anonymous:Yes, you can increase the yeast to little less than double.ie 1-3/4th tsp will do (again it depends on the power of your yeast - so use good quality yeast) All the best!

    ReplyDelete
  46. Hi shireen..found you blog while searching for sweet pulv. Your blog is just amazing. Being a mangie myself im so delighted t see all the recips u have mentioned. They all took me back home as I live in the uae.
    Just a question, as I want t try the sannas this weekend, can a mix of idli rice and basmati rice be used for the given ratio of boiled and raw rice?

    Preema

    ReplyDelete
  47. Hi Preema, thanks so much for your kind appreciation of my blog! By idli rice do u mean the rice known as 'mutambo' in konkani - if yes, it will suffice, there is no need to add basmati. However, if by idli rice u mean boiled rice, then u can use basmati (which is also raw rice by itself)

    ReplyDelete
  48. Thanks Shireen for the reply. It was just in time. will go by the first option :)
    Preema

    ReplyDelete
  49. Hi - Im from Chennai and am a manglorian ..I have tried sanna before but the recipe it compltely different as I add coconut to the rice and do not add ural dhall..but am going to try your version today...The only problem is I use theidly cooker..wil ramkens be availab;e in all shops? is there another name for it/

    ReplyDelete
  50. Hi Cynthia: Since I am not from Chennai I googled and found that a lot of baking equipment and other crockery is available at reasonable prices in Poppat Jamaal's, Mount Road/Anna Salai Road, Bang Opp Spencers. My friend from Chennai says u can check in Adyar Murugan Store and ask for idli kinna or katoris. I hope this helps.

    ReplyDelete
  51. Hey Shireen. Thanks for your work on this blog. I just made the sorpatel per your recipe (blood and all) and it is delicious. One quick question here if you will indulge me. You mention ukdo tandul and raw surai. I am assuming that the ukdo tandul should also be raw ie uncooked. Is that true or should it be cooked? Thanks again for your recipes. Reminds me of the good times I had back home growing up.

    ReplyDelete
  52. Hey Shireen, thanks for your work on this blog. I have a question of you will indulge me. The ukdo tandul is also raw ie uncooked, right?

    Best
    Gopal

    ReplyDelete
  53. Hi Gopal, thanks for your compliment. Yes Ukdo tandul is pre boiled - right after harvesting - boiled in large drums of water and then dried in the sun - this process causes the rice grains to fluff up a bit. The confusion between raw rice, boiled rice & cooked rice lies in the terms. Raw rice is a variety of rice - where the rice is harvested, husked & sold in the market. Boiled rice is like I mentioned pre boiled, dried & sold. Cooked rice is a method of preparing the raw or boiled rice :D I hope this clarifies. I have added a picture of the Ukdo tandul for your reference! Cheers!

    ReplyDelete
  54. Hi Gopal, thanks for your compliment. Yes Ukdo tandul is pre boiled - right after harvesting - boiled in large drums of water and then dried in the sun - this process causes the rice grains to fluff up a bit. The confusion between raw rice, boiled rice & cooked rice lies in the terms. Raw rice is a variety of rice - where the rice is harvested, husked & sold in the market. Boiled rice is like I mentioned pre boiled, dried & sold. Cooked rice is a method of preparing the raw or boiled rice :D I hope this clarifies. I have added a picture of the Ukdo tandul for your reference! Cheers!

    ReplyDelete
  55. Thanks for your reply Shireen.I will use raw ukdo tandul and raw surai as per your directions. I am from kadri in mangalore, where are you from? I miss Mangalore so very much. I loved growing up there. A truly cosmopolitan society in a non city setting. Unique to India for sure. Best, Gopal

    ReplyDelete
  56. @ Gopal, I am from Urwa and I miss Mangalore too! Hence the food - it helps me stay connected to my roots.

    ReplyDelete
  57. hey, Im from Urva too, small world.... been using some of your recipes for quite some time now, lazy to comment though, but you being a fellow urvaite & all, I had to write something. All of them have turned out great, used toddy instead of yeast for sannas, & todays batch(second one) tasted just like the ones you get at Brothers(Kadri/Nanthoor highway)
    Thanks a lot for blogging.

    ReplyDelete
  58. Hi Navin! Thanks a ton :) good to know u r from Urva too!! Happy Easter & I am glad you liked the sanna!

    ReplyDelete
  59. Hi Shireen, came to this recipe from srivalli's ICC Challenge of this month.. you have given a good description of the Recipe and the origin.. very well explained. I hope I could get them as good as yours...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks a ton Nupur! I hope you try & enjoy the Sanna :) Do revert if you have any doubts :)

      Delete
    2. I got them perfect Shereen /... Thanks again for making me aware of this wonderful dish :)

      Delete
    3. Sounds super Nupur! Glad to know that you enjoyed them :)

      Delete
  60. Hi Shireen, I have soaked the rice and daal, but when you say do not stir the batter, I am confused. Are you trying to say that after grinding and adding yeast, stir, but once fermented, do not stir! So wouldn't the batter be thick at the top? Also should the batter consistency be like the usual idli batter?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Vaishali,

      I have mentioned under Step # 5:

      The batter would have doubled - for fluffy Sannas do not stir the batter or it will go flat.

      So yes, after you grind the rice you need to adjust the consistency there itself. Then add the yeast and mix it well into the batter. Stirring at this stage is a must so that yeast mixes well & does its job. But after that you keep the pan undisturbed till it doubles in quantity - this should take 1-1/2 (one and a half) hours if good quality yeast is used and the weather is nice & warm. Once the batter doubles, do not stir - because the dough will fall flat and your sanna will not turn out fluffy as they should You need to use a ladle and scoop out portion by portion and put it in the ramekins/katoris

      And yes, the batter should be thick like idli batter but not too runny

      Hope this answers your doubts. Pls feel free to revert if you have more doubts!

      Rgds
      Shireen

      Delete
  61. Thanks for such wonderful information as how to prepare Sannas. Is it possible to avoid Sugar ? Does this taste like IDLI ?

    ReplyDelete
  62. Are Sannas & Idli are same ? Can sugar be avoided ? Is it a substitute to Idli ?

    ReplyDelete
  63. Hi Pradipdas51: Sanna is a softer and fluffier version of the idli. Idli has a dominant flavour of urad dal and is tougher & more grainy in its texture. Yes sugar may be avoided for health reasons if you wish, but a little sugar brings out the flavours. It can definitely be used as a substitute to idlis - they are versatile and can be eaten with curries or chutneys or even with honey, sugar and ghee or chocolate sauce

    ReplyDelete
  64. Hi Ruchik,

    I have been searching for sanna recipe for a long time and I tried your recipe on the weekend and it was exactly how you showed it in your photos

    it was yummy and soft

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Caroline,

      Thanks for the appreciation & so glad to know that you enjoyed the Sanna! By the way my name's Shireen and not Ruchik!

      Delete
  65. Hi Shireen,

    What does ruchik randhap mean if thats not your name.
    My question was what if i tried adding yeast to my regular idli dosa batter, other than the quick fermentation, does the taste change?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Rush,

      If you see the tag line on my banner, 'Ruchik Randhap' is a term in Konkani that means 'Delicious Cooking'.

      I have never tried adding yeast to regular idli dosa batter. To my knowledge, the urad dal in idlis help the fermentation but by nature idlis are not very 'fluffy' like sanna. From many people I gather that they find sanna to have the 'yeast' smell - you can try it if you like. Let me know how it goes

      Delete
  66. This is hilarious because my name is Sanna LOL.
    But nice recipe I shall try this new form of idlis :)

    ReplyDelete
  67. Hi shireen, every recipe that I have tried from ruchik randhap has always turned very good . THANKYOU so much for this website. It has helped me a lot .
    I feel sad to say I failed in only one and I am sure I made a mistake but donno where, so, I need ur help. I ground the rice for sanna and urad like u said. Added yeast. The batter rose but I think I did not wait till it doubled. The sanna where flat and mushy. Does the batter have to double? I used parboiled rice and instead of surai(which I did not have), I used basmati. Can u help me on this. Does it have to be steamed only 15-20minutes, since it did not rise, I steamed longer but to no help.
    I need help with this, so sorry.
    I love all the other recipes I have tried so I am worried about this one. Thanks
    And have a wonderful NEW YEAR!!
    Vvn

    ReplyDelete
  68. @ Sanna Madan: That's funny! You have such a cute name though :) Hope you tried these sannas!

    ReplyDelete
  69. @Ven: Thanks so much for the great feedback and confidence you have placed in my blog. I am sad to note that the Sanna didnt work for you. A few questions:
    1. Did you grind the rice and urad dal separately? This is important as the urad when ground separately fluffs up nicely.
    2. You need to let the dough double and then carefully remove the dough and fill your ramekins with it. Each ramekin can be filled upto 2/3rds full. Once filled, don't move them around too much or bang them against the surface or the air bubbles will escape and the dough that has risen will fall flat
    3. Parboiled rice is partially boiled rice also known as idli rice. It is used in recipes which call for a combination of boiled rice+raw rice. However in my recipe I have asked for a combination of two types instead of parboiled. I am not sure if its the right substitute you have used. Since I have never used it for Sanna I cannot tell you for sure that the rice is to be blamed.
    4. Steaming is done for 18-20 mins but if the problem lies in the batter not doubling up then little can be done to save the sanna later.

    Sorry for the delay in responding, If you have more queries please feel free to comment here or email me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com. Thanks!

    Have a lovely year ahead!

    ReplyDelete
  70. Shireen, Thanks for the reply, I am going to try them out again, This time I will let the dough double and I will change the rice. Will let you know how it turns out. Today I just finished preparing "egg roce curry" . Turned out Yummm.... This recipe really takes little time and is delicious. Thanks again.
    Ven

    ReplyDelete
  71. got a 10 on 10 for sanna and kori gassi from my mother in law. all credit to you. thanks a lot. tried them for the first time in my life. very happy.

    ReplyDelete
  72. @ Ven: Thanks once again for the feedback on the egg roce curry :) glad u liked it!
    @pushpa: So happy to hear that! Hope you are able to try out many more recipes from the blog and impress your mom in law! :)

    ReplyDelete
  73. Hello Shireen,

    Thanks a ton for this recipe....I am a telugu-ite but I spent two whole years in Mangalore - and fell hopelessly in love with the cuisine! I remember the steaming hot Sanas served with chicken curry for functions...amazing!! And the fish curries from restaurants, the chicken sukka, and trips to Ideal ice cream- where u get the yummiest ice-cream ever!!

    Sanas taste nothing like Idlis and should not even be compared to Idlis, they are a million times better!!

    ReplyDelete
  74. @ Me: Thanks so much for youyr wonderful comment, so happy to know that you love Mangalorean cuisine as much as you love the other things about Mangalore. It is one of the best places to be! Yes, Sannas are a class apart! Fluffy goodness that is great to mop up any curry and satisfy your soul :) Happy to hear from you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Shireen, I stumbled upon your blog and must say your recipe for sannas sounds really good. Will try it out soon. I'm a malayalee btw and love idlis and sannas equally. In your blog and replies to viewers, idlis are underrated as less soft and spongy. Not true. I have always made super soft, fluffy and spongy idlis. The trick is knowing what rice to use and how to make them I guess. Will let you know how my sannas turn out. I plan to use Goa rice that's available here in Mumbai where I live. Also known as idli rice. Super for appams too.

      Delete
  75. Hi Renuka,

    Thanks for your lovely compliment! Well, I have always eaten idlis at restaurants and those have always been less soft and spongy than sannas, so my views are solely governed by my experience. I am sure there are various ways of making them and they will turn out great when the right type of rice is used, please do share your recipe and I will definitely give it a try. My email id is ruchikrandhap@gmail.com. Thanks and hope you enjoy the Sanna!

    ReplyDelete
  76. Dear Shireen,

    Thank you for your prompt reply. Here's my surefire recipe for idlis.


    Three measures of boiled rice
    Two measures of Goa rice/idli rice/ponni rice
    One measure good quality udad dal
    One measure poha or white beaten rice
    One and a half teaspoonful methi seeds

    Mix boiled rice and idli rice, wash well and soak overnight. Add the methi seeds.
    Wash and soak the udad an hour before you begin the grinding process. Wash and add the beaten rice to the deal just five mins before grinding as it gets mushy quickly.
    I use an Ultra Tabletop wet grinder with a bowl of one and a half litre capacity.
    Grind the udad adding a little water off and on. In twenty to twenty five mins the dal should be ground well. It will appear light and fluffy. Remove it to a big vessel which will allow it enough space to rise.
    Next, grind the rice taking care to add enough water so the grinder stone moves smoothly but do not make it a very loose batter. It should be fairly thick or the idlis will sink when cooked.
    Grind the rice till the consistency is like fine semolina. I find the idlis turn out fine even if the rice is ground smooth. This way I use it both for idlis and dosas or utthappams.
    When done, add salt to taste and mix the dal and rice batter with your hand preferably so it ferments better. Be careful while mixing the batter. Don't adopt a heavy handed approach or whisk it too vigorously. Fold in the batter lightly as you would with a cake mix. You need to incorporate air into the mix. Now close the vessel and set aside to ferment overnight. I generally give it fifteen hours to ferment naturally if the weather is cool. In summer end hours should do. Do try it out and I hope you get the kind of idlis I do. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  77. Hi Renuka, Thanks a ton for your lovely recipe, I will definitely give it a try! By measure do you mean cup? Pls let me know, thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  78. Hi Shireen....

    If I replace the yeast with Toddy...What should the quantity be?

    Roona

    ReplyDelete

I'd love to hear what you have to say about this post!

If you are unable to post a comment, please write to me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com

Last but not the least, my name is Shireen & not Ruchik :-)

Saturday, June 11, 2011

Sanna (Mangalorean Idlis/Steamed Rice Cakes)

If you are a Mangalorean/Goan you can conjour up the best of memories when you see a plate of steaming sannas, isnt it? Picture this - a bowl of piping hot Pork Sorpotel or Pork Bafat with some steaming fresh from the tondor Sannas - Bliss! Being a Mangalorean Catholic, the deep rooted love for Sannas came naturally and even the thought of Sannas brings to my mind a sweet fragrance of fermenting rice batter that attaches itself to everything from the steam to the kitchen walls and also to those who are preparing them. 

Sannas used to be a grand affair when I was little. They were always made to mark some celebratory occasion - feasts, festivals and birthdays, when it was made in abundance to cater to a large number of guests who poured into our homes. My fondest memories are of my mum hurriedly pouring batter into ramekins, batch after batch and trying to finish off just in time to attend the midnight Mass on Christmas Eve. We would then return from Mass and have a second round of dinner - Sannas with Pork. Yum!


I think, most Mangaloreans I know would have eaten Sannas with Dukramaas (Pork Bafat) on Christmas day - year after year. This is like the Christmas Day staple diet. When I was in Mangalore, many churches/schools, especially St. Agnes Special school used to host the 'Christmas Tree' celebrations or 'Fancy Fetes' on Christmas day or the day after (usually during the Christmas week). It was impossible not to bump into a hundred relatives, friends and those you met last year on the same date during the same fete :-) And it was impossible to avoid the standard question "Christmas gammath gi? Kalein special?" (Did you have a jolly good time for Christmas? What was special for lunch?) and yeah - the most standard answer would be "Sanna ani Dukramaas". Although there would be other special items on the menu in every house, it went without saying that 'Sannas & Pork' were the highlight of the day.

While the world famous South Indian Idli is undoubtedly one of my most favourite breakfast items, the Sannas - the cousin of the Idli, is a class apart and wins hands down. While the Idli is fermented with the use of Urad Dal  (Black Gram Dal) (original method) or the instant versions use a combo of baking soda/fruit salt & yogurt to give it the 'fermented' feel and make it double in quantity instantly, the Sannas use the traditional method of fermenting the batter with the use of Toddy/Arrack (fermented coconut water which miraculously transforms itself into cheap liquor) or yeast (usually dry yeast). The texture of the Idli is slightly coarse as one needs to grind the batter to a 'rawa' like (grainy) consistency and the colour is a cloudy white owing to the comparitively larger proportion of Urad Dal used. The Sannas are fluffier and whiter and every housewife will claim that she holds the recipe to Sannas that are 'Kapsa Bori' (as fluffy as Cottonwool!)


Sugar is also added to the batter before it is poured into 'gindul (singular) /gindlaan (plural)' (ramekins) and steamed in a steamer (tondor - similar to the dhokla maker) which gives the Sannas a sweeter taste than regular Idlis. 

The Sannas also score over the Idlis as you can eat Sannas for breakfast - with Chutney and/or Sambhar,  for lunch & dinner as an accompaniment to Chicken/Pork/Mutton/Beef/Vegetable curries/gravies. During teatime one can savour them with a little Sweetened Roce (coconut milk) or by simply dipping them in Tea/Coffee. Leftover Sannas are also deep fried and eaten as a pakora (but I would never recommend it as the Sannas absorb a lot of oil!). Infants and toddlers often love the Sanna dipped in milk or ghee and sugar - crunchy & yummy. If you are bored with the regular Sanna, you can make sweet or savoury stuffed Sannas too! How versatile! 


Although Sannas were traditionally made in every Mangalorean/Goan home, it is available in bakeries today. Some housewives take regular/seasonal orders and have them home delivered. It is considered cost effective by many people including office goers and senior citizens who are in no position to dabble with the whole Sanna making process. However, Sannas taste best when they are fresh and warm - right out of the 'tondor'!

I think I should stop rambling about the Sannas and give you a chance to try them out! If you have made Idlis before, this should come easy, if not, don't worry, there's always a first time :-) - the one you wont regret!


Sanna
Yield: Approx 25-27 sannas when the batter is well fermented. For a heigher yield take a ratio of 3:1 (cups of boiled rice : raw rice)
Recipe Source: My mum

You Need:
  • 1-1/2 cups Boiled rice (also called as Parboiled rice/Ukda Chawal/Idli Rice/Ukdo/Katsambar)
  • 1/2 cup Raw rice (smalled grained rice such as Kolam in Hindi/Surai in Konkani/Belthige Akki in Kannada) - I use Satyam brand Kolam rice which is really nice
  • 1 fistful Urad dal (Split Black Gram Dal) (about 1/4 cup)
  • 1 heaped tsp yeast
  • 1 tsp sugar (to prepare the yeast solution) 
  • 3-4 tbsp tepid water (to prepare the yeast solution)
  • salt to taste (about 1 level tsp for the above mentioned quantity)
  • sugar to taste (around 2-3 tsps)
Method:
1. Wash and soak the two types of rice and Urad dal separately (in separate vessels) for at least 3 hours in plenty of water
2. First grind the Urad dal to a fine paste and remove it - this helps in making the Sannas fluffy. Next, grind both types of rice together to a fine thick batter (not as coarse as Idli batter). Try to use as little water as possible to grind. It should be of dosa batter consistency but not too thick. Transfer to a wide, deep pan large enough to accomodate batter that will double during fermentation.
3. Prepare the yeast solution by mixing the yeast and sugar in a bowl of tepid water. The sugar helps the yeast to dissolve faster. Allow to stand for 10 minutes, the yeast will ferment and turn frothy. Stir to ensure that all the yeast granules have dissolved and what you have is a thick solution.


4. Mix the yeast solution into the batter until completely incorporated. Add sugar to taste (batter can be mildly sweet like appams - but it's upto you how sweet you want them). Add salt to taste (around 1 level tsp) Mix well and cover with a thin muslin cloth and place it undisturbed in a warm place to ferment for about 2 hours (during really hot weather, the batter will ferment in just about 1-1/2 hours)
5. The batter would have doubled - for fluffy Sannas do not stir the batter or it will go flat. Place sufficient water in the steamer (tondor) and bring the water to a boil. Keep ramekins greased and ready. Pour batter into them half full. Place these ramekins into the steamer, cover the lid and steam for 15-20 minutes. Remove the lid carefully so as to prevent the vapour from falling on the Sannas (making the surface slightly soggy) and the steam from burning your hands/face. Carefully remove the ramekins and place them face down on a large plate. Allow to cool (to speed up this process if you need the ramekins for the second batch, place cold wet towels over them to speeden up the cooling process).
6. Once cool, remove carefully and serve ! enjoy!

87 comments:

  1. Lovely idlis...looks so spongy and soft...pearly white and I am sure it would be great with any spicy accompaniment.

    ReplyDelete
  2. superb soft n moist idlis..never heard abt this version..thanx for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Shir I made them too twice.. Was so happy it came out nice. Love sannas.

    Will try this version too and let u know.
    Looooved the third snap :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Quite a new idlis for me, adding yeast sounds interesting,cant wait to try this soon..love that cute moulds..

    ReplyDelete
  5. They look really nice n fluffy like little pillows! A great new version n a must try!
    US Masala

    ReplyDelete
  6. They looks really soft and wow,treat for eyes too !I am sure I will enjoy making this!

    ReplyDelete
  7. the idlis look so soft and delicious..new to me..glad to follow u..do visit my space when time permits :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Looks yummy! I will try it today :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thanks Priya :) lemme know how they turn out!

    ReplyDelete
  10. It came out really good!! Thanks for the recipe Shireen. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Wonderful Priya!! Glad u liked it :)

    ReplyDelete
  12. Sanna looks delicious.Can we substitute yeast with baking powder.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hi Lavina, thanks! Actually there is no real substitute for yeast. Toddy is a known substitute for yeast as both contain the micro organisms that are required to rise the dough. However, using baking soda with a combination of lime juice may help, but I cannot guarantee you that the results will be exactly like that of yeast. Baking soda is used where ingredients are naturally acidic, so in order to give the near perfect result as yeast you may add equal parts of baking soda (not baking powder) and lemon juice to equal the amount of yeast called for in the recipe. I have never tried it, so i cannot give you a 100% assurance that it will work. Do try the recipe with yeast itself - it is available with any grocer. Just ask for active dry yeast - in the gulf you can use DCL brand or in India you can ask for Bakers or Bluebird brands

    ReplyDelete
  14. Thanks Shireen for your wonderful explanation of using baking soda instead of yeast. Somehow i could get Fleischmann's Yeast Active Dry Yeast From Walmart(I live in USA).I will give a try . The Combination of dukramaas with sanna is so tempting.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Thanks for the Sanna recipes. one of my favourites.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Referring to the above comment - fleischmann's yeast is pretty strong as compared to our indian brand, so i guess you should use it lesser than required

    ReplyDelete
  17. Can I do it without the "1 fistful Urad dal (Split Black Gram Dal? Because I'm not sure what that is. ;)
    Also, what is the purose of using the "1 fistful Urad dal (Split Black Gram Dal)?"
    Thank You.
    I'm Christy

    ReplyDelete
  18. I have another questions. Can I use regular asian jasmine rice on this recipe? I from USA and where I live, not sure where I can find the "boiled rice' [Idli Rice].
    christy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Christy,

      Are you in the bay area? If so, you can find boiled rice at New India Bazaar on El Camino Real, Santa Clara. Stores that sell products from Kerala usually carry it too.

      Delete
  19. Hi Christy, ideally you need to use all the ingredients mentioned, but you may skip the Urad Dal which can be found in Indian stores by the name of White Black Gram Dal. But I know people who have lentil allergies who skip them while making Sannas. Urad dal is used to aid fermentation of the batter and ofcourse for the flavour & texture.

    However you will need to use a combination of boiled rice (which looks almost like arborio rice) and raw rice (you may use Basmati rice). In India, sometimes instead of the combination of these two types of rice (boiled rice + raw rice) we use a single type of rice called Parboiled rice which I am not sure will be available in Indian/Asian speciality stores, do give it a try though. Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Thanks for replying back. Maybe I'll give it a try when I find the ingredients. Again thank you!
    Christy

    ReplyDelete
  21. Hi Christy, I am sure you will find all the ingredients at any well stocked Indian store in your locality. I will update this post with the pictures of the different kinds of rice just to help you get an idea :)

    ReplyDelete
  22. Hi Shireen, made your sanna's yesterday! with red rice and sambhar turned out really well, I had used not used yeast in Idlis, this was new to me :), thanks for sharing...

    ReplyDelete
  23. Great to hear that Jayasri!! Glad u liked the Sannas :)

    ReplyDelete
  24. Hi Shireen,
    Just made sannas,and they turned out awesome!Thanks for sharing the recipe.

    ReplyDelete
  25. @Unknown: Thanks so much for the feedback!! Great to hear that they turned out well :)

    ReplyDelete
  26. Hi, i am new to your blog. I tried out your sannas recipe last week and it came out perfect, just the way it looks in your pics :)!! I have always been wanting to make sannas all my life but to no success. I just stumbled upon your website and thought let me try, since your instructions to prepare were very clear cut and looked easy. I am so happy that I finally got the right recipe for making soft and tasty sannas! Thank you!!

    ReplyDelete
  27. @Karen: Thanks so much!! It feels so good to know that the Sannas turned out fine! Do let me know if you've tried some more recipes and how you liked them!

    ReplyDelete
  28. hi shireen,
    i followed ur recipe exactly and it came out perfect. thank u so much
    jasmin

    ReplyDelete
  29. @Jasmin: Thanks so much for your feedback!! Feels great to know that you tried and liked them :)

    ReplyDelete
  30. Hi Shireen - Honestly, I am so blogged about your blog :) It truly is a piece of virtual salivating heaven, I must say! :)

    Anyways, I was wondering if these Idlies can be made in an Idly cooker? cause that's what I have. I live in Seattle, so it's really hard for me to get these utensils. Probably I should get one when I come to India. BTW, I am a Banglorean :)

    ReplyDelete
  31. @Unknown: Thank you soo much!! I am humbled by your compliments! Well, if you don't have regular sanna ramekins u can try the idly cooker, but the result won't be the same, so do try and get them on your next trip to India!

    ReplyDelete
  32. I live in Brazil and here Urad/moong dhal or for the matter-of-fact any other type of dhal is not available. Thank you for this recipe...I am surely going to try it any my kids are going to love it.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Thanks a lot Veena! Good luck with the Sannas, hope u like them :)

    ReplyDelete
  34. Thanks for the tips about the vessel, Shireen! Btw, I am Poornima.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Thanks for your comment Poornima! Hope you like the Sanna!

    ReplyDelete
  36. I tried this recipe without the urad dal, it came out really good. It was great having a reply from you SHireen, made me so much more connected to India.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Thanks so much for your feedback Veena! So good to know that the Sanna came out good even without the urad dal! It feels great to be connected to you too - the internet is truly a terrific invention!

    ReplyDelete
  38. Hi Shireen I am going to try sannas tomorrow. Just wanted to know if the grinding is possible in a mixie. I dont have a wet grinder. What is the consistency I should look for?
    Ashwini

    ReplyDelete
  39. Hi Ashwini, yes, grinding is possible in a mixie, I do the same too. Use the jar that has a blade meant for grinding rice (the one that looks like a fan), it will be the bigger jar of your mixie. You need to grind the batter fine like dosa batter, however retain the water from the mixie (when you have removed the batter & added water to wash it) and add it to the batter...it should be wee bit thinner than dosa batter but not runny.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Hi shireen
    have a doubt if want to make these sannas early in d morning then can i let the batter to ferment for whole night. First time trying my hand on this. Please help. Also would the soaking time vary. Thanks.
    Lavina sequeira

    ReplyDelete
  41. Hi Lavina,

    If the weather is not too warm (like Mlore) you may leave it to ferment overnight, as I know a lot of people who do that. Also, the quality/brand of yeast used will determine how fast your batter will ferment. Since I use DCL brand of yeast it ferments in no time and I've had a case of batter going sour when I left it overnight - which is why if I intend to make the sannas for breakfast I usually steam them the previous evening, refrigerate and then lightly steam (not microwave!) them again in the morning - they turn out super soft and fluffy!

    ReplyDelete
  42. Thanks for the reply dear. I am in mumbai i have bright star brand yeast. I think i will make it in the evening and steam it next day. Hope it turns out well. Also does the rice and lentils need to be soaked only for 3 hours or can be soaked longer too.
    Shireen i love all ur recipes. I dont know if u remember me but i have commented earlier too on raw plantain curry (star moon). I recomended ur site to my sis who is in dubai and she was very happy. She just loved the way u pen down even minute things. She made kori curry and was happy with the result. Dev bhoren karu tuka.

    ReplyDelete
  43. Thanks so much for all the lovely things you said Lavina. Thanks also for recommending my site to your sister. Glad to know that she liked the kori curry :-)

    Well, if you soak the rice+urad dal for more than 2-3 hours they say the batter turns out sour fast. I have personally not gone beyond 3 hours, so haven't experienced this. But if you leave it to ferment for too long it will definitely go sour

    ReplyDelete
  44. Hi! Thank you for sharing your sanna recipe. You have mentioned that for a heigher yield take a ratio of 3:1 (cups of boiled rice : raw rice)- I would be grateful if you could let me know if the quantity of yeast also should be increased. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  45. @ Anonymous:Yes, you can increase the yeast to little less than double.ie 1-3/4th tsp will do (again it depends on the power of your yeast - so use good quality yeast) All the best!

    ReplyDelete
  46. Hi shireen..found you blog while searching for sweet pulv. Your blog is just amazing. Being a mangie myself im so delighted t see all the recips u have mentioned. They all took me back home as I live in the uae.
    Just a question, as I want t try the sannas this weekend, can a mix of idli rice and basmati rice be used for the given ratio of boiled and raw rice?

    Preema

    ReplyDelete
  47. Hi Preema, thanks so much for your kind appreciation of my blog! By idli rice do u mean the rice known as 'mutambo' in konkani - if yes, it will suffice, there is no need to add basmati. However, if by idli rice u mean boiled rice, then u can use basmati (which is also raw rice by itself)

    ReplyDelete
  48. Thanks Shireen for the reply. It was just in time. will go by the first option :)
    Preema

    ReplyDelete
  49. Hi - Im from Chennai and am a manglorian ..I have tried sanna before but the recipe it compltely different as I add coconut to the rice and do not add ural dhall..but am going to try your version today...The only problem is I use theidly cooker..wil ramkens be availab;e in all shops? is there another name for it/

    ReplyDelete
  50. Hi Cynthia: Since I am not from Chennai I googled and found that a lot of baking equipment and other crockery is available at reasonable prices in Poppat Jamaal's, Mount Road/Anna Salai Road, Bang Opp Spencers. My friend from Chennai says u can check in Adyar Murugan Store and ask for idli kinna or katoris. I hope this helps.

    ReplyDelete
  51. Hey Shireen. Thanks for your work on this blog. I just made the sorpatel per your recipe (blood and all) and it is delicious. One quick question here if you will indulge me. You mention ukdo tandul and raw surai. I am assuming that the ukdo tandul should also be raw ie uncooked. Is that true or should it be cooked? Thanks again for your recipes. Reminds me of the good times I had back home growing up.

    ReplyDelete
  52. Hey Shireen, thanks for your work on this blog. I have a question of you will indulge me. The ukdo tandul is also raw ie uncooked, right?

    Best
    Gopal

    ReplyDelete
  53. Hi Gopal, thanks for your compliment. Yes Ukdo tandul is pre boiled - right after harvesting - boiled in large drums of water and then dried in the sun - this process causes the rice grains to fluff up a bit. The confusion between raw rice, boiled rice & cooked rice lies in the terms. Raw rice is a variety of rice - where the rice is harvested, husked & sold in the market. Boiled rice is like I mentioned pre boiled, dried & sold. Cooked rice is a method of preparing the raw or boiled rice :D I hope this clarifies. I have added a picture of the Ukdo tandul for your reference! Cheers!

    ReplyDelete
  54. Hi Gopal, thanks for your compliment. Yes Ukdo tandul is pre boiled - right after harvesting - boiled in large drums of water and then dried in the sun - this process causes the rice grains to fluff up a bit. The confusion between raw rice, boiled rice & cooked rice lies in the terms. Raw rice is a variety of rice - where the rice is harvested, husked & sold in the market. Boiled rice is like I mentioned pre boiled, dried & sold. Cooked rice is a method of preparing the raw or boiled rice :D I hope this clarifies. I have added a picture of the Ukdo tandul for your reference! Cheers!

    ReplyDelete
  55. Thanks for your reply Shireen.I will use raw ukdo tandul and raw surai as per your directions. I am from kadri in mangalore, where are you from? I miss Mangalore so very much. I loved growing up there. A truly cosmopolitan society in a non city setting. Unique to India for sure. Best, Gopal

    ReplyDelete
  56. @ Gopal, I am from Urwa and I miss Mangalore too! Hence the food - it helps me stay connected to my roots.

    ReplyDelete
  57. hey, Im from Urva too, small world.... been using some of your recipes for quite some time now, lazy to comment though, but you being a fellow urvaite & all, I had to write something. All of them have turned out great, used toddy instead of yeast for sannas, & todays batch(second one) tasted just like the ones you get at Brothers(Kadri/Nanthoor highway)
    Thanks a lot for blogging.

    ReplyDelete
  58. Hi Navin! Thanks a ton :) good to know u r from Urva too!! Happy Easter & I am glad you liked the sanna!

    ReplyDelete
  59. Hi Shireen, came to this recipe from srivalli's ICC Challenge of this month.. you have given a good description of the Recipe and the origin.. very well explained. I hope I could get them as good as yours...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks a ton Nupur! I hope you try & enjoy the Sanna :) Do revert if you have any doubts :)

      Delete
    2. I got them perfect Shereen /... Thanks again for making me aware of this wonderful dish :)

      Delete
    3. Sounds super Nupur! Glad to know that you enjoyed them :)

      Delete
  60. Hi Shireen, I have soaked the rice and daal, but when you say do not stir the batter, I am confused. Are you trying to say that after grinding and adding yeast, stir, but once fermented, do not stir! So wouldn't the batter be thick at the top? Also should the batter consistency be like the usual idli batter?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Vaishali,

      I have mentioned under Step # 5:

      The batter would have doubled - for fluffy Sannas do not stir the batter or it will go flat.

      So yes, after you grind the rice you need to adjust the consistency there itself. Then add the yeast and mix it well into the batter. Stirring at this stage is a must so that yeast mixes well & does its job. But after that you keep the pan undisturbed till it doubles in quantity - this should take 1-1/2 (one and a half) hours if good quality yeast is used and the weather is nice & warm. Once the batter doubles, do not stir - because the dough will fall flat and your sanna will not turn out fluffy as they should You need to use a ladle and scoop out portion by portion and put it in the ramekins/katoris

      And yes, the batter should be thick like idli batter but not too runny

      Hope this answers your doubts. Pls feel free to revert if you have more doubts!

      Rgds
      Shireen

      Delete
  61. Thanks for such wonderful information as how to prepare Sannas. Is it possible to avoid Sugar ? Does this taste like IDLI ?

    ReplyDelete
  62. Are Sannas & Idli are same ? Can sugar be avoided ? Is it a substitute to Idli ?

    ReplyDelete
  63. Hi Pradipdas51: Sanna is a softer and fluffier version of the idli. Idli has a dominant flavour of urad dal and is tougher & more grainy in its texture. Yes sugar may be avoided for health reasons if you wish, but a little sugar brings out the flavours. It can definitely be used as a substitute to idlis - they are versatile and can be eaten with curries or chutneys or even with honey, sugar and ghee or chocolate sauce

    ReplyDelete
  64. Hi Ruchik,

    I have been searching for sanna recipe for a long time and I tried your recipe on the weekend and it was exactly how you showed it in your photos

    it was yummy and soft

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Caroline,

      Thanks for the appreciation & so glad to know that you enjoyed the Sanna! By the way my name's Shireen and not Ruchik!

      Delete
  65. Hi Shireen,

    What does ruchik randhap mean if thats not your name.
    My question was what if i tried adding yeast to my regular idli dosa batter, other than the quick fermentation, does the taste change?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Rush,

      If you see the tag line on my banner, 'Ruchik Randhap' is a term in Konkani that means 'Delicious Cooking'.

      I have never tried adding yeast to regular idli dosa batter. To my knowledge, the urad dal in idlis help the fermentation but by nature idlis are not very 'fluffy' like sanna. From many people I gather that they find sanna to have the 'yeast' smell - you can try it if you like. Let me know how it goes

      Delete
  66. This is hilarious because my name is Sanna LOL.
    But nice recipe I shall try this new form of idlis :)

    ReplyDelete
  67. Hi shireen, every recipe that I have tried from ruchik randhap has always turned very good . THANKYOU so much for this website. It has helped me a lot .
    I feel sad to say I failed in only one and I am sure I made a mistake but donno where, so, I need ur help. I ground the rice for sanna and urad like u said. Added yeast. The batter rose but I think I did not wait till it doubled. The sanna where flat and mushy. Does the batter have to double? I used parboiled rice and instead of surai(which I did not have), I used basmati. Can u help me on this. Does it have to be steamed only 15-20minutes, since it did not rise, I steamed longer but to no help.
    I need help with this, so sorry.
    I love all the other recipes I have tried so I am worried about this one. Thanks
    And have a wonderful NEW YEAR!!
    Vvn

    ReplyDelete
  68. @ Sanna Madan: That's funny! You have such a cute name though :) Hope you tried these sannas!

    ReplyDelete
  69. @Ven: Thanks so much for the great feedback and confidence you have placed in my blog. I am sad to note that the Sanna didnt work for you. A few questions:
    1. Did you grind the rice and urad dal separately? This is important as the urad when ground separately fluffs up nicely.
    2. You need to let the dough double and then carefully remove the dough and fill your ramekins with it. Each ramekin can be filled upto 2/3rds full. Once filled, don't move them around too much or bang them against the surface or the air bubbles will escape and the dough that has risen will fall flat
    3. Parboiled rice is partially boiled rice also known as idli rice. It is used in recipes which call for a combination of boiled rice+raw rice. However in my recipe I have asked for a combination of two types instead of parboiled. I am not sure if its the right substitute you have used. Since I have never used it for Sanna I cannot tell you for sure that the rice is to be blamed.
    4. Steaming is done for 18-20 mins but if the problem lies in the batter not doubling up then little can be done to save the sanna later.

    Sorry for the delay in responding, If you have more queries please feel free to comment here or email me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com. Thanks!

    Have a lovely year ahead!

    ReplyDelete
  70. Shireen, Thanks for the reply, I am going to try them out again, This time I will let the dough double and I will change the rice. Will let you know how it turns out. Today I just finished preparing "egg roce curry" . Turned out Yummm.... This recipe really takes little time and is delicious. Thanks again.
    Ven

    ReplyDelete
  71. got a 10 on 10 for sanna and kori gassi from my mother in law. all credit to you. thanks a lot. tried them for the first time in my life. very happy.

    ReplyDelete
  72. @ Ven: Thanks once again for the feedback on the egg roce curry :) glad u liked it!
    @pushpa: So happy to hear that! Hope you are able to try out many more recipes from the blog and impress your mom in law! :)

    ReplyDelete
  73. Hello Shireen,

    Thanks a ton for this recipe....I am a telugu-ite but I spent two whole years in Mangalore - and fell hopelessly in love with the cuisine! I remember the steaming hot Sanas served with chicken curry for functions...amazing!! And the fish curries from restaurants, the chicken sukka, and trips to Ideal ice cream- where u get the yummiest ice-cream ever!!

    Sanas taste nothing like Idlis and should not even be compared to Idlis, they are a million times better!!

    ReplyDelete
  74. @ Me: Thanks so much for youyr wonderful comment, so happy to know that you love Mangalorean cuisine as much as you love the other things about Mangalore. It is one of the best places to be! Yes, Sannas are a class apart! Fluffy goodness that is great to mop up any curry and satisfy your soul :) Happy to hear from you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Shireen, I stumbled upon your blog and must say your recipe for sannas sounds really good. Will try it out soon. I'm a malayalee btw and love idlis and sannas equally. In your blog and replies to viewers, idlis are underrated as less soft and spongy. Not true. I have always made super soft, fluffy and spongy idlis. The trick is knowing what rice to use and how to make them I guess. Will let you know how my sannas turn out. I plan to use Goa rice that's available here in Mumbai where I live. Also known as idli rice. Super for appams too.

      Delete
  75. Hi Renuka,

    Thanks for your lovely compliment! Well, I have always eaten idlis at restaurants and those have always been less soft and spongy than sannas, so my views are solely governed by my experience. I am sure there are various ways of making them and they will turn out great when the right type of rice is used, please do share your recipe and I will definitely give it a try. My email id is ruchikrandhap@gmail.com. Thanks and hope you enjoy the Sanna!

    ReplyDelete
  76. Dear Shireen,

    Thank you for your prompt reply. Here's my surefire recipe for idlis.


    Three measures of boiled rice
    Two measures of Goa rice/idli rice/ponni rice
    One measure good quality udad dal
    One measure poha or white beaten rice
    One and a half teaspoonful methi seeds

    Mix boiled rice and idli rice, wash well and soak overnight. Add the methi seeds.
    Wash and soak the udad an hour before you begin the grinding process. Wash and add the beaten rice to the deal just five mins before grinding as it gets mushy quickly.
    I use an Ultra Tabletop wet grinder with a bowl of one and a half litre capacity.
    Grind the udad adding a little water off and on. In twenty to twenty five mins the dal should be ground well. It will appear light and fluffy. Remove it to a big vessel which will allow it enough space to rise.
    Next, grind the rice taking care to add enough water so the grinder stone moves smoothly but do not make it a very loose batter. It should be fairly thick or the idlis will sink when cooked.
    Grind the rice till the consistency is like fine semolina. I find the idlis turn out fine even if the rice is ground smooth. This way I use it both for idlis and dosas or utthappams.
    When done, add salt to taste and mix the dal and rice batter with your hand preferably so it ferments better. Be careful while mixing the batter. Don't adopt a heavy handed approach or whisk it too vigorously. Fold in the batter lightly as you would with a cake mix. You need to incorporate air into the mix. Now close the vessel and set aside to ferment overnight. I generally give it fifteen hours to ferment naturally if the weather is cool. In summer end hours should do. Do try it out and I hope you get the kind of idlis I do. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  77. Hi Renuka, Thanks a ton for your lovely recipe, I will definitely give it a try! By measure do you mean cup? Pls let me know, thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  78. Hi Shireen....

    If I replace the yeast with Toddy...What should the quantity be?

    Roona

    ReplyDelete

I'd love to hear what you have to say about this post!

If you are unable to post a comment, please write to me at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com

Last but not the least, my name is Shireen & not Ruchik :-)